They Drive by Night: Raoul Walsh and a Few Good Women

Four months after finishing Dark Command at Republic Pictures, Raoul Walsh returned to the Warner Bros. sound stages in Burbank to direct his second picture for the studio, the Jerry Wald- Richard Macauley scripted They Drive by Night, a hard-knocks drama, partly drawn from a novel by A.B. Bezzerides, partly recycled from an earlier Warner Bros. picture starring Bette Davis, 1935’s Bordertown. With Mark Hellinger, who had penned The Roaring Twenties, as associate producer, with the ever-vigilant Hal Wallis as executive producer, and with Walsh at the helm, the picture—even before production began—had success written all over it.

With its dark and gritty palate, its broken-down characters who try to but cannot outdistance their psychological and economic hard times, They Drive by Night is quintessential Warner Bros., a picture in the studio’s tradition of broken-down dreams (what the critic Manny Farber later called the “broken field journey”), the cinematic equivalent of literary naturalism characterized by the inability of men and women to control or get out from under the unforgiving social forces that loom large and significant around them. Walsh gives his lower-middle class characters in They Drive by Night both a lyricism and a biting wit in this story of two brothers who try to make a go of it as truckers in Los Angeles but who find heartache and hard times for their effort. Far more intimate than The Roaring Twenties, They Drive by Night shows off Walsh’s skill in creating lyrical segues between hope and hopelessness, humor and pathos. More than anything else at this early period in Walsh’s tenure at the studio, They Drive by Night demonstrates just how easily he and Warner Bros. entered into a lasting marriage of shared values.

Ironies abounded for Walsh himself during this time in his life, however. Even though They Drive by Night would be one of the most pleasurable shoots he encountered in a long time, the easiness of his work at the studio stood in direct contrast to the chaos swimming around him in his personal life. In the years since D.W. Griffith ingénue Miriam Cooper divorced Walsh in 1926, she hauled him into court as often as she could, demanding more and more alimony, or claiming he failed to pay alimony and child support for their two adopted sons, Robert and Jack, even claiming that his checks to her were delinquent – which they very often were. Miriam was relentless. Prior to and during this shoot, Walsh was in court at least twice, once missing a particular court date only because a subpoena intended for him ended up in the hands of his step-daughter, Marilyn, who happened to open the front door of their Doheny Drive home in Walsh’s absence and afterward neglected to hand the papers over to him. To make matters more urgent and complicated, two days before production began on They Drive by Night, Walsh’s eighteen-year-old son, Robert, who had decided he’d had enough of living with his mother on the East Coast, won the approval of a Los Angeles judge to have himself placed under Walsh’s guardianship instead of Miriam’s, and Walsh found himself with another threat to his equilibrium, a son he hardly knew or had seen for years. Everything associated with Miriam seemed to be sucking the life out of him.

In this state of mind, in late April 1940, Walsh began shooting They Drive by Night. Still trying to extricate himself financially and psychologically from Miriam, no he doubt he approached the picture with a vivid understanding of the human abyss into which a woman could send a man – probably the very awareness he needed to get this film made. As if his life were designed by some kind of perverted serendipity, Walsh now found himself directing a picture whose emotional centerpiece was a deranged female who murders her husband and attempts to bring her lover down since she cannot have him to herself. In Walsh’s mind, it no doubt seemed as if Miriam were everywhere. He could easily believe that since she divorced him (due to his philandering, she claimed) she unconsciously set out to take her revenge any way she could. Walsh could have hardly missed the irony in all this as he read the script, which, interestingly enough, he helped to shape in its early stages. The psychological havoc a fictional female unleashes on the screen bore an uncanny resemblance to that brought upon him by Miriam Cooper. The character of Lana Carlsen in They Drive by Night, played by Ida Lupino—in a recycled version of Bette Davis’ deranged wife in Bordertown—murders her husband (Alan Hale) and almost ruins the life of the man, Joe Fabrini (George Raft), she loves and wants but cannot have. If Miriam were not out and out trying to kill Walsh, she was at least taking a good, emotional chunk out of him.

Warner Bros. paid two thousand dollars for the rights to A.I. Bezzerides’ novel, The Long Haul, in March 1940, although not all of the novel made its way into the script in the studio’s rush to get it to the screen. That same month Wallis hired Wald and Macauley to write the script, whose title was soon changed to They Drive by Night. Jack Warner was pleased enough with the success of The Roaring Twenties that he handed Walsh this new picture without a moment’s hesitation.

Wallis saw the film as a vehicle for Raft and could not be swayed to consider anyone else for the part of Joe, the film’s main character. Raft was not one of Walsh’s favorites, especially since the actor’s trouble-making shenanigans on the set of The Bowery seven years earlier. Unfortunately, Walsh had little to say about Raft being cast. Raft had come to Warner Bros. from Paramount Studios in 1938. At this point in his career, he had enough clout at the studio to be placed in any one of several films on the drawing board, He was seen as a solid leading man who could both tough it out with hoods and woo his female co-stars at the same time.

Wallis was excited about the story and Walsh was equally optimistic about its promise as a full-blown actioner. In mid-March Wallis sent Walsh a memo: “I am glad that you are hopped up on the trucking story. I too feel that it will work out as an excellent vehicle for George Raft. I am entirely in accord with your idea to go out within the next few weeks whenever we get good weather and clouds and make some of the road shots. Will you please begin to line up a truck immediately and after you have made a selection let me see it…?”

Hellinger asked Walsh to help fine-tune Wald and Macauley’s script and wrote Wallis a few days later, “Wald, Walsh and I never stopped talking about it all evening – and when guys are that enthused, something good must come of it.” Hellinger wanted the young British actress, Ida Lupino, for the part of Lana, but Walsh had several other actresses in mind, including Frances Farmer and another yet untested starlet, Catherine Emery. He wrote Wallis, “I saw the test of Catherine Emery and she is a splendid actress and I am sure she could give a fine and intelligent performance of the part of Lana. I think she can be photographed a little more attractively. She has a refined quality, that, if she plays the part, I would like to modify.” He added, “I would prefer to withhold my decision until I make a test of Frances Farmer.” But Hellinger moved faster than Walsh, and Lupino was signed soon after Walsh’s memo to him.

Humphrey Bogart was cast as Paul Fabrini, Joe’s younger brother, and Walsh could see that Bogie was not entirely happy about being the fourth lead in the film. Walsh had no qualms about directing Bogie but was always mindful of Bogie’s often dour mood on the set during a day’s shoot. His mood for the most part depended on whether or not he and his wife at the time, Mayo Methot, fought it out to the wee hours the night before. Bogart’s mood was dour more often than not, Walsh later wrote in his autobiography; he complained most about the hours, as he did not appreciate waking early and spending long hours waiting around on the set. Walsh later recalled a particular complaint Bogart made while they were on location and had to spend some nights in a hotel in a small California town. Due to the thin partitions that substituted for walls in their hotel, Bogey was unwillingly privy to some heavy lovemaking coming from the next room belonging to the actor who played the sheriff in the film. As Bogey put it to Walsh, “’I can’t knock any man for getting his ashes hauled, but there’s a time and place for everything. I don’t know who the sheriff had in his bed last night, but it was like listening to a goddam earthquake.’”

Walsh did not look forward to working with Raft when shooting began. He later said, “Raft was speaking to me again. He seemed to have forgotten The Bowery. His acting improved since that day I told him to jump off the Brooklyn Bridge. He was better at memorizing dialogue and he was careful about the way he dressed. He was also a star in his own right.” Walsh never expressed any dissatisfaction he had with Raft to Warner or to Wallis, though, and instead showed only enthusiasm for the picture. As it turned out, production on They Drive by Night remained uneventful except for Bogie’s occasional bad mood, which only endeared him to Walsh in the end.

They Drive by Night is pure Walshian high energy in its tempo and pace. The film’s subject, truckers driving goods to market, moves by means of a relentless masculine energy, and Raft and Bogart work together smoothly and efficiently. The film’s view of the world – that the downtrodden have to tough it out repeatedly– seeps into every frame. The events look like a rehash of many Warner Bros.’ films released before this one. But Walsh injects such high energy into the characters and storyline that the film’s pace becomes its most flamboyant subjects and sets it apart from the others.

The brothers Fabrini, trying to get ahead in a world that dares them not to, move from hard knocks to tragedy before they see the light at the end of the tunnel and are given a meager chance at happiness at the story’s end. Transporting fruit from grower to seller, the brothers are able to make a few dollars and buy their own truck. But one night Bogart falls asleep at the wheel, the truck turns over. Bogie loses an arm in an accident that demolishes their truck. Raft, always the steadier and more ambitious of the two brothers, is forced to work for a friend, Ed, (played by Alan Hale) who owns a larger, more successful trucking company.

Although Raft has already met and plans to marry a street-smart waitress with a heart of gold, Cassie (Ann Sheridan), Hale’s flirtatious and up-to-no-good wife Lana (Lupino) falls hard for Raft and makes countless plays for his affections. While Lana comes to take up more and more of the film’s attention (part of its schizoid nature, which has not gone unnoticed by viewers over the years), Raft’s girlfriend Cassie gets in a few of her own good one-liners before she’s pushed to the sidelines to wait patiently for her man. “That’s enough of the X-ray treatment!” she snaps to a customer at her counter who stares at her. She has a few more before the scenes ends. “Anything else?” she asks Joe when she first serves him coffee at the counter. “Yeah, but it ain’t on the menu,” he throws out. “And it ain’t gunna be?” she throws back.

The psychotic Lana eventually murders Ed to clear the path to get Raft for herself. But Raft still will have nothing to do with her. When he learns that she murdered Ed, he turns her in. But Lana convinces the D.A. that Raft forced her to murder her husband and Raft finds himself on trial. While on the witness stand, however, Lana suffers a breakdown (driven mad by her guilt over killing Ed), spills the truth, and Joe is cleared of any charges.

After Walsh finished shooting, Wallis called in director Vincent Sherman to direct an additional scene. Sherman was asked to keep the shoot under his hat and to complete it “speedily” and “as soon as possible.” It amounted to a group of newsmen at the trial just as they learn that Lana has broken down and confessed to the murder. “City desk! [each man reaches for a phone]… “The doctors say she’s daffy. Yeah, she’s gone nuts…they had to take her away in a straightjacket. The case has been thrown out. Fabrini goes free.” Walsh was not told about the added scene, and studio production notes give no explanation for it.

Warner Bros. released They Drive By Night on August 3, 1940, this despite a threat from the American Trucking Association that had both Harry and Jack Warner worried with claims that depicting Bogie’s character as asleep at the wheel was “detrimental to the trucking industry” and was “a direct slap at the effective safety regulations of the Interstate Commerce Commission (“a driver can’t go more than ten hours and must rest every eight hours before returning to work”). However, the studio headed off any legal action and the film’s fictive elements were left intact.

Warner Bros.’ brilliant publicist Martin Weiser devised an exploitation maneuver to promote the film. A fifteen-ton big rig was driven across the country, purported to present co-star Ann Sheridan to moviegoers. As Eric Lax and A.M. Sperber write in their biography of Bogart, “also on the rig were the good wishes of five hundred thousand members of the International Brotherhood of Teamsters and the painted autographs of truckers, mayors, and members of fan clubs, added at every stop between Chicago and Los Angeles. The empty vehicle became a news item, and before long the whole country was talking about “’the Sheridan truck.’”

They Drive by Night became an immediate boxoffice success and proved lucky for Lupino and Bogie, who were cast in Walsh’s next actioner for Warner Bros., High Sierra. Bogie never had to complain about getting fourth billing again.

Alluding to the film’s bizarre merging of two seemingly disparate stories – a trucking actioner and the story of a psychotic female – Walsh explained the incongruity (that worked nonetheless) with his characteristic sense of humor. “I guess they ran out of the trucking idea,” he quipped, “and tacked on that ending with Lupino going nuts on the stand.” He added, “That got her a seven-year contract at Warner Bros., you know.” Lana Carlson’s crack-up on the witness stand got Ida Lupino a seven-year contract at the studio – just about the amount of time Miriam Cooper continued to haul Walsh into court.

From Marilyn Ann Moss’ biography of Raoul Walsh, The True Adventures of Raoul Walsh, by Marilyn Ann Moss,  published by The University Press of Kentucky.

Raoul Walsh Filmography

Walsh as Director

1913

The Pseudo Prodigal (Reliance)
Director: Raoul Walsh. Released December 20, 1913.
Cast: Sue Balfour, Miriam Cooper, Robert Harron, Ralph Lewis, Raoul Walsh.

1914

The Double Knot (Majestic)
Director: Raoul Walsh. Running time: 2r. Released May 24, 1914.
Cast: Mary Alden, Jack O’Brien, Raoul Walsh.

The Life of General Villa (Mutual)
Producers: H.E. Aitken, Frank N. Thayer. Supervising producer: D.W. Griffith. Director: W. Christy Cabanne, Raoul Walsh. Writer: Frank E. Woods. Cinematographer: L.M. Burrud, Raoul Walsh (Battle of Torreon sequence). Running time: 7 r. Filmed in Mexico. Released May 9, 1914.
Cast: Irene Hunt (Villa’s sister), W.H. Lawrence (Federal officer), Walter Long (Federal officer), Teddy Sampson (Villa’s sister), Pancho Villa (himself), Raoul Walsh (Villa as a young man), Eagle Eye, Mae Marsh, Robert Harron.
On 4/17/15 a version cut down to four reels was re-issued as The Outlaw’s Revenge, a Mutual Masterpiece.

The Mystery of the Hindu Image (Majestic)
Director: Raoul Walsh. Running time: 2 r. Released July 26, 1914.
Cast: Nick Cage, Dark Cloud, Richard Cummings, Eagle Eye, Raoul Walsh.

The Sheriff’s Prisoner (Reliance)
Director: Arthur Mackley, Raoul Walsh. Released July 29, 1914.
Cast: Eugene Pallette, Vester Pegg, Arthur Mackley, F.A. Turner, Florence Crawford, Richard Cummings, Raoul Walsh.

The Final Verdict (Majestic)
Director: John B. O’Brien. Running time: 2 r. Released September 13, 1914.
Cast: Francelia Billington (Mary), Raoul Walsh (King), Eagle Eye, Joseph Singleton.

The Gunman (Reliance)
Directors: Christy Cabanne, Raoul Walsh. Story: George Pattullo. Released August 1, 1914.
Cast: Eugene Pallette, Miriam Cooper, Sam De Grasse, Ralph Lewis, F.A. Turner.

The Bowery
Director: Raoul Walsh.

1915

Home from the Sea (Reliance/Majestic)
Supervising producer: D.W. Griffith. Director: Raoul Walsh. Running time: 1 r.
Cast: Raoul Walsh, Ralph Lewis, Francelia Billington.

The Death Dice (Reliance)
Director: Raoul Walsh. Story: George Pattullo. Running time: 2 r. Released February 13, 1915.
Cast: Eugene Pallette, Irene Hunt, Fred Burns, Vester Pegg, Joseph P. McCarthy.

The Fatal Black Bean (Majestic)
Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Russell Smith. Running time: 1 r. Released February 23, 1915.
Cast: Miriam Cooper, Elmer Clifton, Eagle Eye, Jennie Lee, Raoul Walsh.

His Return (Reliance)
Director: Raoul Walsh. Story: Russell E. Smith. Running time: 2 r. Released March 5, 1915.
Cast: Miriam Cooper, Elmer Clifton, Howard Gaye.

The Greaser (Majestic)
Director: Raoul Walsh. Running time: 2 r. Released March 23, 1915
Cast: Fred Church, Elmer Clifton, Miriam Cooper, Vester Pegg, Raoul Walsh

The Tramp (Reliance)
Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Russell Smith. Running time: 1 r.
Cast: Thomas Jefferson.

The Artist’s Wife (Majestic)
Director: Raoul Walsh. Running time: 1 r. Released April 2, 1915.
Cast: Miriam Cooper, Elmer Clifton, Vester Pegg.

The Fencing Master (Majestic)
Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Raoul Walsh. Running time: 2 r.
Cast: Thomas Jefferson (Monsieur La Rogue), Frank Bennett (Claude, La Rogue’s nephew), Teddy Sampson (Yvette, La Rogue’s ward), George Walsh (Morode, a duelist).

A Man for all That (Majestic)
Director: Raoul Walsh. Running time: 2 r. Released April 17, 1915.
Cast: Elmer Clifton (Young convict), Miriam Cooper (Young boy’s sister), Tom Wilson (The warden), Raoul Walsh (Detective), Jennie Lee (Young boy’s mother), Paul Willis (Young boy).

The Smuggler (Majestic)
Director: Raoul Walsh. Running time: 1 r. Released May 11, 1915.
Cast: Raoul Walsh (Connors), Billie West (Betty Sampson), Ralph Lewis (John Sampson), John T. Dillon (Wilson), Elmer Clifton.

11:30 PM (Majestic)
Director: Raoul Walsh. Running time: 2 r. Released May 23, 1915.
Cast: Sam De Grasse (Lloyd James), Loretta Blake (Muriel Main), Erich von Ritzau, George Walsh, Al W. Filson, Curt Rehfeld.

The Outlaw’s Revenge (Mutual)
Director: William Christy Cabanne, Raoul Walsh. Filmed in Mexico. Released April 15, 1915.
Cast: Raoul Walsh (The outlaw), Irene Hunt (The outlaw’s older sister), Teddy Sampson (The outlaw’s younger sister), Mae Marsh (The American lover), Robert Harron (The American lover), Eagle Eye (The outlaw’s servant), Walter Long (Federal officer), Spottiswoode Aitken (The soothsayer), W.E. Lawrence (Federal officer).

The Celestial Code (Reliance)
Director: Raoul Walsh. Running time: 2 r. Released June 5, 1915.
Cast: Irene Hunt, George Walsh, Harry L. Fraser, Dark Cloud, Tote Du Crow, James Warnack, Al W. Filson, Harry Burns.

A Bad Man and Others (Reliance)
Director: Raoul Walsh. Running time: 2 r. Released June 26, 1915.
Cast: George Walsh, Elmo Lincoln, Violet Wilkey, Daisy Jefferson, W.E. Lowry, Nat G. Deverich.

The Regeneration (Fox)
Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Raoul Walsh, Carl Harbaugh (from a play by Owen Kildare and Walter Hackett). Running time: 6 r. Released September 13, 1915.
Cast: Rockliffe Fellowes, Anna Q. Nisson, Carl Harbaugh, John McCann, William Sheer, James A. Marcus, Maggie Weston, H. McCoy.

Carmen (Fox)
Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Raoul Walsh (based on the novel by Prosper Mérimée). Running time: 5 r. Released November 1, 1915.
Cast: Theda Bara (Carmen), Einar Linden (Don Jose), Carl Harbaugh (Escamillo), James A. Marcus (Dancaire), Emil De Varney (Captain Morales), Elsie MacLeod (Michaela), Fay Tunis (Carlotta).

1916

The Serpent (Fox)
Producer: William Fox. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Raoul Walsh, George Walsh, based on a story “The Wolf’s Claw” by Philip Bartholomae. Cinematographer: Georges Benoît. Running time: 6 r. Released January 23, 1916.
Cast: Theda Bara (Vania Lazar), James A. Marcus (Ivan Lazar), Lillian Hathaway (Martsa Lazar), Charles Craig (Grand Duke Valanoff), Carl Harbaugh (Prince Valanoff).

Blue Blood and Red (Fox)
Producer: Raoul Walsh. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Raoul Walsh. Cinematographer: Georges Benoît, Len Powers, George Richter. Assistant director: J. Gordon Cooper. Running time: 5 r. Released April 2, 1916.
Cast: George Walsh (Algernon DuPont), Martin Kinney (Peterkin), Doris Pawn, James A. Marcus, Jack Woods, Augustus Carny, Vester Pegg.

Pillars of Society (Triangle)
Supervising director: D.W. Griffith. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: D.W. Griffith, based on the play “Samfundets stotter” by Henrik Ibsen. Running time: 5 r. Released August 27, 1916.
Cast: Henry B. Walthall (Karsten Bernick), Mary Alden (Lona Tonnesen), Juanita Archer (Betty), George Beranger (Johan Tonnesen), Josephine Crowell (Karsten’s mother), Olga Grey (Madame Linda Dorf), Raoul Walsh.

1917

The Honor System (Fox)
Producer: William Fox. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Raoul Walsh, from a story by Henry Christeen Warnack. Cinematographer: Georges Benoît, Len Powers, George Richter. Set designer: George Grenier. Assistant director: J. Gordon Cooper. Running time: 10 r. Released February 12, 1917.
Cast: Milton Stills (Joseph Stanton), Cora Drew (His mother), James A. Marcus (Gov. John Hunter), Arthur Mackley (Steven Holt), Miriam Cooper (Edith), George Walsh (Jack Taylor), Charles Clary (Crales Harrington), Gladys Brockwell (Trixie Bennett), Roy Rice (Three-Fingered Louis), Pomeroy Cannon (James Phelan), Johnny Reese (Mugsey). New York Premiere: The Lyric Theatre. Re-released in 8 reels, March 1, 1920.

Hearts and Saddles (Fox)
Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Robert Eddy, Tom Mix. Running time: 2 r. Released March 31, 1917.
Cast: Tom Mix, Victoria Forde, Victor Potel, Sid Jordan, Pat Chrisman

The Silent Lie (Fox)
Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Chester B. Clapp, based on the short story “Conahan” by Harry Evans. Cinematographer: Dal Clawson. Running time: 5 r. Released May 28, 1917.
Cast: Miriam Cooper (Lady Lou), Ralph Lewis (Hatfield), Charles Clary (Conahan), Monoe Salisbury (The Stranger), Henry A. Barrows (The Priest), Howard Davies (The Fur Dealer), William Eagle Shirt (The Indian).

The Innocent Sinner (Fox)
Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Raoul Walsh, from a short story by Mary Synon. Cinematographer: Dal Clawson. Running time: 6 r. Released July 21, 1917.
Cast: Miriam Cooper (Mary Ellen Ellis), Charles Clary (David Graham), Jack Standing (Walter Benton), Jane Novak (Jane Murray), Rosita Marstini (Madame De Coeur), William Parsons (Bull Clark), Johnny Reese (The Weasel), Jennie Lee (Mother Ellis).

Betrayed (Fox)
Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Chester B. Clapp, Raoul Walsh. Cinematographer: Dal Clawson. Released September 2, 1917.
Cast: Miriam Cooper (Carmelita), James A. Marcus (Carpi), Hobart Bosworth (Leopoldo Juares), Monte Blue (Pepo Esparenza), Wheeler Oakman (William Jerome).

This is the Life (Fox)
Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Raoul Walsh. Cinematographer: Dal Clawson. Running time: 5 r.
Cast: George Walsh, Wanda Hawley, James A. Marcus, Ralph Lewis, Jack McDonald, William Ryno, Hector Sarno.

The Conqueror (Fox)
Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Chester B. Clapp, Raoul Walsh, based on a story by Henry Christeen Warnack. Cinematographer: Dal Clawson. Set designer: George Grenier. Running time: 8 r. Released September 16, 1917.
Cast: William Farnum (Sam Houston), Jewel Carmen (Eliza Allen), Charles Clary (Sidney Stokes), James A. Marcus (Jumbo), Carrie Clark Ward (Mammy), William Chisholm (Dr. Spencer), Robert Dunbar (Judge Allen), Owen Jones (James Houston), William Eagle Shirt (Indian Chief), Chief Birdhead (Indian Chief), Little Bear (Indian Chief).

The Pride of New York (Fox)
Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Raoul Walsh, based on a story by Ralph Spence. Cinematographer: Dal Clawson. Running time: 5 r. Released December 9, 1917.
Cast: George Walsh (Jim Kelly), James A. Marcus (Pat Kelly), William Bailey (Harold Whitley), Regina Quinn (Mary).

1918

The Woman and the Law (Fox)
Producer: William Fox. Executive producer: Winfield R. Sheehan. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Raoul Walsh (based on the DeSaulles murder case). Running time: 7 r. Filmed in Miami Beach, FL. Released March 17, 1918.
Cast: Jack Connors (Mr. Jack La Salle), Miriam Cooper (Mrs. Jack La Salle), George Humbert, Peggy Hopkins Joyce (Josie Sabel), Agnes Neilson, Ramsey Wallace.

The Prussian Cur (Fox)
Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Raoul Walsh. Cinematographer: Roy Overbaugh. Running time: 8 r. Released September 1, 1918.
Cast: Miriam Cooper (Rosie O’Grady), Sidney Mason (Dick Gregory), H. von der Goltz (Otto Goltz), Leonora Steward (Lillian O’Grady), James A. Marcus (Patrick O’Grady), Pat O’Malley (Jimmie O’Grady), Walter McEwen (Count Johann von Bernstorff), William Black (Wolff von Eidel), Ralph Faulkner (Woodrow Wilson), Walter Lawrence (Emperor William II), Charles Reynolds (Emperor William I), William Harrison (Crown Prince Frederick), James Hathaway (Field Marshal von Hindenburg), Pat Hartigan (Adm. Von Tirpitz), John E. Franklin (James W. Gerard), John Harbon (U.S. Congressman).

On the Jump (Fox)
Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Raoul Walsh, based on scenario by Ralph Spence. Cinematographer: Roy Overbaugh. Running time: 6 r. Released March 31, 1918.
Cast: George Walsh (Jack Bartlett), Frances Burnham (Margaret Desmond), James A. Marcus (William Desmond), Henry Clive (Otto Crumley), Ralph Faulkner (President Woodrow Wilson).

Every Mother’s Son (Fox)
Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Raoul Walsh. Running time: 5 r. Released December 1, 1918.
Cast: Charlotte Walker (An American mother), Percy Standing (An American father), Edwin Stanley (Eldest son), Ray Howard (Second son), Gareth Hughes (Third son), Corona Paynter (Daughter of France), Bernard Thornton (Lt. Von Sterbling).

I’ll Say So (Fox)
Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Ralph Spence. Editor: Ralph Spence. Running time: 5 r. Released December 22, 1918.
Cast: George Walsh (Bill Durham), Regina Quinn (Barbara Knowles), William Bailey (August Myers), James Black (Carl Vogel), Ed Keeley (Judge).

1919

Evangeline (Fox)
Producer: Raoul Walsh. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Raoul Walsh, based on the poem by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. Cinematographer: Devereaux Jennings. Original music: Fred Fischer, Joseph McCarthy. Running time: 5 r. Released August 19, 1919.
Cast: Miriam Cooper (Evangeline), Alan Roscoe (Gabriel), Spottiswoode Aitken (Benedict Bellefontaine), James A. Marcus (Basil), Paul Weigel (Father Felician), William A. Wellman (British Lieutenant).
Should a Husband Forgive? (Fox)
Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Raoul Walsh. Cinematographer: Devereaux Jennings. Running time: 7 r. Released November 1, 1919.
Cast: Miriam Cooper (Ruth Fulton), Beatrice Beckley (Mary Carroll), Eric Mayne (John Carroll), Vincent Coleman (John Carroll, Jr.), Lyster Chambers (Rogue), Percy Standing (Rex Burleigh), Charles Craig (A human jackal).

1920

The Strongest (Fox)
Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Raoul Walsh, based on the novel by Georges Clemenceau. Cinematographer: Ben Bail. Running time: 5 r. Released February 1920. Originally released with tinted sequences.
Cast: Renee Adoree (Claudia), Carlo Liten (Henri), Harrison Hunter (Harle), Beatrice Noyes (Betty Macklin), Florence Malone (Claire Harle), Jean Gauthier De Trigny (Visconte), Madame Tressida (Nanette), Georgette Gauthier De Trigny (Comtesse), James A. Marcus (Curate), C.A. de Lima (Prefect of Police).

The Deep Purple (Realart)
Producer: Raoul Walsh. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Earle Browne, from the play by Paul Armstrong and Wilson Mizner. Cinematographer: Jacques Bizeul. Art director: William Cameron Menzies. Running time: 7 r. Released May 2, 1920.
Cast: Miriam Cooper (Doris Moore), Helen Ware (Kate Fallon), Vincent Serrano (Harry Leland), William J. Ferguson (Pop Clark), Stuart Sage (William Lake), William B. Mack (Gordon Laylock), Lincoln Plumer (Connelly), Ethel Hallor (Flossie), Lorraine Frost (Phyllis Lake), Louis Mackintosh (Mrs. Lake), Amy Ongley (Christine), Walter Lawrence (Finn), J.C. King (Inspector George Bruce), Eddie Sturgis (Skinny), C.A. de Lime (Balke).

From Now On (Fox)
Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Raoul Walsh, from a story by Frank L. Packard. Cinematographer: Joseph Ruttenberg. Running time: 7 r. Released September 26, 1920.
Cast: George Walsh (Dave Henderson), Regina Quinn (Teresa Capriano), Mario Majeroni (Capriano), Paul Everton (Bokky Sharvan), James A. Marcus (Martin Tydeman), Tom Walsh (Detective Barjan), Cesare Gravina (Tony Lomazzi), Robert Byrd (Millman). Originally shown with tinted sequences.

1921

The Oath (Mayflower)
Producer: Raoul Walsh. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Ralph Spence, based on the novel “Idols” by William J. Locke. Cinematographer: Dal Clawson, G.O. Post. Costumes: Miriam Cooper. Running time: 8 r. Released April 10, 1921.
Cast: Miriam Cooper (Minna Hart), Robert Fischer (Israel Hart), Conway Tearle (Hugh Coleman), Henry Clive (Gerald Merriam), Ricca Allen (Anna Cassaba), Anna Q. Nilsson (Irene Lansing).

Serenade (R.A. Walsh)
Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: James T. O’Donohoe, from the play “Maria del Carmen” by Jose Feliu i Codina. Running time: 7 r. Released August 21, 1921.
Cast: Miriam Cooper (Maria del Carmen), George Walsh (Pancho), Rosita Marstini (Maria’s mother), James A. Marcus (Pepuso), Josef Swickard (Domingo Maticas), Bertram Grassby (Ramon Maticas), Noble Johnson (Capt. Ramirez), Ethelbert Knott (Don Fulgenico), Eagle Eye (Juan), Ardita Milano (The dancer), Peter Vanzuella (Pedro), John Eberts (the secretary), Tom Kennedy (Zambrano).

1922

Kindred of the Dust (R.A. Walsh)
Producer: Raoul Walsh. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: James T. O’Donohoe, based on the novel by Peter B. Kyne. Cinematographer: H. Lyman Broening, Charles Van Enger. Art director: William Cameron Menzies. Running time: 8 r. Released February 27, 1922.
Cast: Miriam Cooper (Nan of the Sawdust Pile), Ralph Graves (Donald McKaye), Lionel Belmore (The Laird of Tyee), Eugenie Besserer (Mrs. McKaye), Maryland Morne (Jane McKaye), Elizabeth Waters (Elizabeth McKaye), William J. Ferguson (Mr. Daney), Caroline Rankin (Mrs. Daney), Patrick Rooney (Dirty Dann O’Leary), John Herdman (Caleb Brent), Bruce Guerin (Little Donald).

1923

Lost and Found on a South Sea Island (Goldwyn)
Producer: Samuel Goldwyn. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Paul Bern, from a story by Carey Wilson. Cinematographer: Clyde de Vinna, Paul Kerschner. Editors: H.H. Caldwell, Katherine Hilliker. Running time: 7 r. Released February, 1923.
Cast: House Peters (Capt. Blackbird), Pauline Starke (Lorna), Antonio Moreno (Lloyd Warren), Mary Jane Irving (Baby Madge), Rosemary Theby (Madge), George Siegmann (Faulke), William V. Mong (Skinner), Carl Harbaugh (Waki), David Wing (Kerito).

1924

The Thief of Bagdad (United Artists)
Producers: Douglas Fairbanks, Theodore Reed. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Achmed Abdullah and Lotta Woods, based on a story by Douglas Fairbanks. Cinematographer: Arthur Edeson. Editor: William Nolan. Music: Carl Davis. Production designer: William Cameron Menzies. Costume designer: Mitchell Leisen. Assistant director: James T. O’Donohoe. Running time: 14 r. Released March 23, 1924.
Cast: Douglas Fairbanks (The Thief of Bagdad), Snitz Edwards (His evil associate), Charles Belcher (The Holy Man), Julanne Johnston (The Princess), Sojin (The Mongol Prince), Anna May Wong (The Mongol Slave), Brandon Hurst (The Caliph), Tote Du Crow (The Soothsayer), Noble Johnson (The Indian Prince).

1925

East of Suez (Paramount)
Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Sada Cowan, based on a story by W. Somerset Maugham. Cinematographer: Victor Milner. Running time: 7 r. Released January 12, 1925.
Cast: Pola Negri (Daisy Forbes), Edmund Lowe (George Tevis), Rockliffe Fellowes (Harry Anderson), Noah Beery (British Consul), Sojin Kamiyama (Lee Tai), Wong Wing (Amah), Florence Regnart (Sylvia Knox), Charles Requa (Harold Knox), E.H. Calvert (Sidney Forbes).

The Spaniard (Paramount)
Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: James T. O’Donohoe, based on a novel by Juanita Savage. Cinematographer: Victor Milner. Art director: Lawrence Hitt. Running time: 7 r. Released May 4, 1925.
Cast: Ricardo Cortez (Don Pedro de Barrego), Jetta Goudal (Dolores Annesley), Noah Beery (Gomez), Mathilde Brundage (Senora de la Carta), Renzo De Gardi (Count de Albaveque), Emily Fitzroy (Maria), Bernard Siegel (Manuel), Florence Regnart (Consuelo).

1926

The Wanderer (Paramount)
Producers: Jesse L. Lasky, Raoul Walsh, Adolph Zukor. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: James T. O’Donohoe, based on the play by Maurice V. Samuel. Cinematographer: Victor Milner. Music: Hugo Riesenfeld. Art director: Lawrence W. Hitt. Running time: 9 r. Originally released with tinted prints.
Cast: Greta Nissen (Tisha), William Collier Jr. (Jether), Ernest Torrence (Tola), Wallace Beery (Pharis), Tyrone Power (Jesse), Kathryn Carver (Naomi), Kathlyn Williams (Huldah), George Regas (Gaal), Holmes Herbert (Prophet), Snitz Edwards (Jeweler), Myrna Loy (Girl at Baccanal, uncredited).

The Lucky Lady (Paramount)
Producer: Raoul Walsh. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: James T. O’Donohoe, based on a story by Bertram Bloch and Robert Sherwood. Cinematographer: Victor Milner. Released April 26, 1926.
Cast: Greta Nissen (Antoinette), Lionel Barrymore (Count Ferranzo), William Collier, Jr. (Clarke), Marc McDermott (Franz Garletz), Carrie Daumery (Duchess), Sojin (Secretary to Garletz).

The Lady of the Harem (Paramount)
Producers: Adolph Zukor, Jesse Lasky. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: James T. O’Donohoe, based on the play “Hassan” by James Elroy Flecker. Running time: 6 r. Released November 1, 1926.
Cast: Ernest Torrence (Hassan), William Collier Jr. (Rafi), Greta Nissen (Pervaneh), Louise Fazenda (Yasmin), George Beranger (Selim), Sojin (Sultan), Frank Leigh (Jafar), Noble Johnson (Tax collector), Daniel Makarenko (Chief of Police), Christian Frank (Captain of the military), Snitz Edwards (Abdu), Chester Conklin (Ali), Brandon Hurst (Beggar), Leo White (Beggar).

What Price Glory? (Fox)
Producer: William Fox. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: James T. O’Donohoe, based on the play by Maxwell Anderson. Cinematography: Barney McGill. Music: R.H. Bassett, Erno Rapee. Assistant director: Daniel Keefe. Running time: 116 minutes. Released November 23, 1926.
Cast: Edmund Lowe (1st Sgt. Quirt), Victor McLaglen (Capt. Flagg), Dolores del Rio (Charmaine de la Cognac), William V. Mong (Cognac Pete), Phyllis Haver (Shanghai Mabel), Elena Jurado (Carmen), Leslie Fenton (Lt. Moore), Barry Norton (Pvt. “Mother’s Boy” Lewisohn), Sammy Cohen (Pvt. Lipinsky), Ted McNamara (Pvt. Kiper), August Tollaire (French Mayor), Mathilde Comont (Camille), Patrick Rooney (Mulcahy).
Remade by John Ford in 1952.

1927

The Monkey Talks (Fox)
Producer: Raoul Walsh. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Gordon Rigby, based on the novel by Rene Fauchois. Cinematographer: L. William O’Connell. Assistant director: R.L. Hough. Running time: 6 r. Released February 20, 1927.
Cast: Olive Borden (Olivette), Jacques Lerner (Jocko Lerner), Don Alvarado (Sam Wick), Malcolm Waite (Bergerin), Raymond Hitchcock (Lorenzo), Ted McNamara (Firmin), Jane Winton (Masisie), August Tollaire (Mata).

The Loves of Carmen (Fox)
Producer: William Fox, Raoul Walsh. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Raoul Walsh, Gertrude Orr, based on the novel “Carmen” by Prosper Mérimée. Cinematographer: Lucien N. Andriot. Editors: H.H. Caldwell, Katherine Hilliker. Assistant director: Archibald Buchanan. Running time: 9 r. Released September 4, 1927.
Cast: Dolores del Rio (Carmen), Don Alvarado (Jose), Victor McLaglen (Escamillo), Nancy Nash (Michaela), Jack Baston (Morales), Mathilde Comont (Emilia), Carmen Costello (Teresa), Fred Kohler (Gypsy Chief), Rafael Valverde (Miguel).

1928

Sadie Thompson (United Artists)
Producers: Raoul Walsh, Gloria Swanson (uncredited). Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Raoul Walsh, based on the story “Miss Thompson” by W. Somerset Maugham and the play “Rain” dramatized therefrom by John Colton and Clemence Randolph. Cinematographor: George Barnes, Robert Kurrle, Oliver Marsh. Editor: C. Gardner Sullivan. Art director: William Cameron Menzies. Running time: 9 r. Filmed at UA Studios and on Santa Catalina Island, CA. Released January 7, 1928.
Cast: Gloria Swanson (Sadie Thompson), Lionel Barrymore (Alfred Davidson), Blanche Friderici (Mrs. Alfred Davidson), Charles Lane (Dr. Angus McPhail), Florence Midgley (Mrs. Angus McPhail), James A. Marcus (Joe Horn), Sophie Artega (Ameena), Will Stanton (Quartermaster Bates), Raoul Walsh (Sgt. Timothy O’Hara)
Later filmed as “Rain” (1932, Lewis Milestone) and “Miss Sadie Thompson” (953, Curtis Berhnardt).

Me, Gangster (Fox)
Producer: William Fox. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Raoul Walsh, Charles Francis Coe based on a story by Charles Francis Coe. Cinematographer: Arthur Edeson. Editor: Louis R. Loeffler. Assistant director: Archibald Buchanan. Running time: 70 minutes. Released October 20, 1928.
Cast: June Collyer (Mary Regan), Don Terry (Jimmy Williams), Anders Randolf (Russ Williams), Carole Lombard (Blonde Rosie).

The Red Dance (Fox)
Producer: Raoul Walsh. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: James Ashmore Crman, based on a story by Eleanor Browne, adapted from the novel “The Red Dancer of Moscow” by H.L. Gates. Cinematographers: Charles Clarke, John Marta. Editor: Louis R. Loeffler. Music: Erno Rapee, S.L. Rothfael. Assistant director: Archibald Buchanan. Running time: 10 r. Released December 2, 1928. Originally released with sound effects and tinted sequences. Footage was used in Walsh’s The Yellow Ticket (Fox, 1931). On May 24, 1932 Fox announced a remake entitled The Red Dancer.
Cast: Dolores del Rio (Tasia), Charles Farrell (Grand Duke Eugen), Ivan Linow (Ivan Petroff), Boris Charsky (Agitator), Dorothy Revier (Princess Varvara), Andres de Segurola (General Tanaroff), Demetrius Alexis (Rasputin).

1929

In Old Arizona (Fox)
Directors: Irving Cummings, Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Tom Barry, based on the story “The Caballero’s Way” by O. Henry. Cinematographer: Arthur Edeson. Editor: Louis R. Loeffler. Sound: Edmund H. Hansen. Running time: 7 r. Shot in Zion and Bryce Canyon National Parks, UT, the Mojave Desert, Victorville, and the San Fernando and San Juan Capistrano Missions, CA.
Cast: Warner Baxter (The Cisco Kid), Edmund Lowe (Sgt. Mickey Dunn), Dorothy Burgess (Tonia Maria).
Baxter won an Academy Award for Best Actor playing the role originally intended for Walsh, but from which he had to withdraw when he lost an eye in an accident.

The Cock-Eyed World (Fox)
Producer: William Fox. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Raoul Walsh, with dialogue by William K. Wells, based on a story by Maxwell Anderson and Laurence Stallings. Cinematographer: Arthur Edeson. Editor: Jack Dennis. Set decorators: Ben Carré, David Hall. Sound: Edmund H. Hansen. Assistant director: Archibald Buchanan. Running time: 12 r. Filmed at Mare Island Naval Yard, Vallejo, and San Diego, CA. Released October 20, 1929.
Cast: Victor McLaglen (Top Sgt. Flagg), Edmund Lowe (Sgt. Harry Quirt), Lili Damita (Mariana Elenita), Leila Karnelly (Olga), El Brendel (Yump Olson), Bob Burns (Connors), Jeanette Dagna (Katinka), Joe Brown (Brownie), Stuart Erwin (Buckley), Ivan Linow (Sanovich), Jean Laverty (Fanny), Soledad Jimenez (Innkeeper), Curly Dresden (O’Sullivan), Joe Rochay (Jacobs), Willie Keeler (Brawler).
Released both in sound and silent versions.

Hot for Paris (Fox)
Producer: William Fox. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Charles J. McGuirk and William K. Wells, based on a story by Raoul Walsh. Cinematographer: Charles Van Enger. Editor: Jack Dennis. Art director: David S. Hall. Set decorator: Ben Carré. Costume design: Sophie Wachner. Sound: George Leverett. Assistant director: Archibald Buchanan. Running time: 7 r. Released December 22, 1929.
Cast: Victor McLAglen (John Patrick Duke), Fifi D’Orsay (Fifi Dupre), El Brendel (Axel Olson), Polly Moran (Polly), Lennox Pawle (Mr. Pratt), August Tollaire (Papa Gouset), George Fawcett (Chop Captain), Charles Judels (Charlott Gouset), Edward Dillon (Ship’s Cook), Rosita Marstini (Fifi’s mother), Agostino Borgato (Fifi’s father), Yola D’Avril (Yola Dupre), Anita Murray (Mimi), Dave Balles (Monsieur Furrier).

1930

The Big Trail (Fox)
Producer: Winfield R. Sheehan. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Jack Peabody, Marie Boyle, and Florence Postal, based on a story by Hal G. Evarts. Cinematographers: Lucien N. Andriot (35 mm version), Arthur Edeson (70 mm version). Editor: Jack Dennis. Set decorators: Harold Miles, Fred Sersen. Production manager: Archibald Buchanan. Running time: 125 minutes (35 mm), 156 minutes (70 mm widescreen version). Filmed on location at Jackson Hole and Grand Tetons, WY, Saint George, UT, Yuma, AZ, Moesie, MT, and at Grand Canyon, Sequoia, and Yellowstone National Parks. Released November 1, 1930.
Cast: John Wayne (Breck Coleman), Marguerite Churchill (Ruth Cameron), El Brendel (Gus), Tully Marshall (Zeke), Tyrone Power, Sr. (Red Flack), David Rollins (Dave Cameron), Frederick Burton (Pa Bascom), Ian Keith (Bill Thorpe), Charles Stevens (Lopez), Louise Carver (Gus’s mother-in-law).
Five different versions of this film were shot simultaneously: (1) a 70mm version in the Grandeur process for exhibition in the biggest movie palaces; (2) a standard 35mm version for general release; (3) a 35mm alternate French language version “La piste des géants” (1931); (4) a 35 mm alternate Spanish language version “La gran jornada” (1931); and (5) a 35 mm alternate German language version “Die große Fahrt” (1931). The three alternate language versions were shot with mostly different casts.

1931

The Man Who Came Back (Fox)
Producer: W.R. Sheehan, Raoul Walsh. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: E.J. Burke, based on the play by Jules Eckert Goodman (based on a novel by John Fleming Wilson). Cinematographer: Arthur Edeson. Editor: Harold D. Schuster. Art director: Joseph Urban. Sound: George Leverett. Running time: 74 minutes. Released January 11, 1931.
Cast: Janet Gaynor (Angie Randolph), Charles Farrell (Stephen Randolph), Kenneth MacKenna (Capt. Trevelyan), William Holden (Thomas Randolph), Mary Forbes (Mrs. Gaynes), Ullrich Haupt (Charles Reisling), Willam Worthington (Capt. Gallon), Peter Gawthorne (Griggs), Leslie Fenton (Baron le Duc).
Remake of a 1924 film directed by Emett Flynn.

Women of All Nations (Fox)
Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Barry Conners. Cinematographer: Lucien N. Andriot. Editor; Jack Dennis. Music: Carli Elinor. Art director: David S. Hall. Sound: George Leverett. Running time: 72 minutes. Released May 31, 1931.
Cast: Victor McLaglen (Captain Jim Flagg), Edmund Lowe (Sgt. Harry Quirt), Greta Nissen (Elsa), El Brendel (Olsen), Bela Lugosi (Prince Hassan), Fifi D’Orsay (Fifi), Humphrey Bogart (Stone; scenes deleted).

The Yellow Ticket (Fox)
Producer: William Fox, Raoul Walsh. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Jules Furthman and Guy Bolton, based on the play by Michael Morton. Cinematography: James Wong Howe. Editor: Jack Murray. Music: Carli Elinor. Art director: William S. Darling. Sound: W.D. Flick. Assistant director: Don B. Greenwood. Running time: 81 minutes. Released October 30, 1931.
Cast: Elissa Landi (Marya Kalish), Lionel Barrymore (Baron Igor Andreeff), Laurence Olivier (Julian Rolfe), Walter Byron (Count Nikolai), Arnold Korff (Grandfather Kalish), Mischa Auer (Melchior), Edwin Maxwell (Police Agent Boligoff), Rita La Roy (Fania Rubinstein).

1932

Wild Girl (Fox)
Producer: William Fox. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Doris Anderson and Edwin Justus Mayer, based on the story “Salomy Jane’s Kiss” by Bret Harte. Cinematographer: Norbert Brodine. Editor: Jack Murray. Music: Louis De Francesco. Set decorator: Joseph C. Wright. Costume designer: Earl Luick. Running time: 78 minutes. Released October 9, 1932.
Cast: Charles Farrell (Billy, the Stranger), Joan Bennett (Salomy Jane), Ralph Bellamy (Jack Marbury), Eugene Pallette (Yuba Bill), Irving Pichel (Rufe Waters), Minna Gombell (Millie, the prostitute), Willard Robertson (Red Pete), Sarah Padden (Lize), Morgan Wallace (Phineas Baldwin).

Me and my Gal (Fox)
Producer: Raoul Walsh. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Arthur Kober, based on the story “Pier 13” by Philip Klein and Barry Conners. Cinematographer: Arthur C. Miller. Editor: Jack Murray. Music: George Lipschultz. Art director: Gordon Wiles. Costume designer: Rita Kaufman. Sound: George Leverett. Running time: 78 minutes.
Cast: Spencer Tracy (Danny Dolan), Joan Bennett (Helen Riley), Marion Burns (Kate Riley), George Walsh (Duke), J. Farrell MacDonald (Pop Riley), Noel Madison (Baby Face), Henry B. Walthall (Sarge), Bert Hanlon (Jake), Adrian Morris (Allen), George Chandler (Eddie Collins).
Remade in 1940 by Eugene Ford with the title “Pier 13.”

1933

Sailor’s Luck (Fox)
Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Charlotte Miller and Marguerite Roberts, based on a story by Bert Hanlon. Cinematographer: Arthur C. Miller. Editor: Jack Murray. Art director: Joseph C. Wright. Costume designer: William Lambert. Sound: George Leverett. Running time: 64 minutes. Released March 17, 1933.
Cast: James Dunn (Jimmy Harrigan), Sally Eilers (Sally Brent), Victor Jory (Baron Portola), Sammy Cohen (Barnacle Benny), Frank Moran (Bilge), Esther Muir (Minnie Broadhurst), Will Stanton (J. Felix Hemingway), Armand “Curly” Wright (Angelo), Jerry Mandy (Rico), Lucien Littlefield (Elmer Brown), Buster Phelps (Elmer Brown, Jr.), Frank Atkinson (Attendant).

The Bowery (United Artists/20th Century Fox)
Producer: Darryl F. Zanuck. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Howard Estabrook and James Gleason, based on the novel “Chuck Connors” by Michael L. Simmons and Bessie Roth Solomon. Cinematographer: Barney McGill. Editor: Allen McNeil. Music: Alfred Newman. Art director: Richard Day. Running time: 92 minutes. Released October 7, 1933.
Cast: Wallace Beery (Chuck Connors), George Raft (Steve Brodie), Jackie Cooper (Swipes McGurk), Fay Wray (Lucy Calhoun), Pert Kelton (Trixie Odbray), Herman Bing (Max Herman), Oscar Apfel (Ivan Rummel), Ferdinand Munier (Honest Mike), George Walsh (John L. Sullivan). Lillian Harmer (Carrie A. Nation).

Going Hollywood (MGM)
Producer: Walter Wanger. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Donald Ogden Steward, from a story by Frances Marion. Cinematographer: George J. Folsey. Editor: Frank Sullivan. Music: Nacio Herb Brown, Arthur Freed. Art director: Merrill Pye. Costume design: Adrian. Sound: Douglas Shearer. Running time: 80 minutes. Released December 22, 1933.
Cast: Marion Davies (Sylvia Bruce), Bing Crosby (Bill “Billy” Williams), Fifi D’Orsay (Lili Yvonne), Stuart Erwin (Ernest Pratt Baker), Ned Sparks (Mr. Bert Conroy), Patsy Kelly (Jill Barker), Bobby Watson (Jack Thompson), Three Radio Rogues (Group performing imitations).

1935

Under Pressure (Fox)
Producer: Robert Kane. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Borden Chase, Lester Cole, Noel Pierce, and Billy Wilder, based on the book “Sand Hog” by Borden Chase and Edward Doherty. Cinematographers: Hal Mohr, L. William O’Connell. Costume design: William Lambert. Running time: 72 minutes. Released February 2, 1935.
Cast: Edmund Lowe (Shocker Dugan), Victor McLaglen (Jumbo Smith), Florence Rice (Pat Dodge), Marjorie Rambeau (Amelia “Amy” Hardcastle), Charles Bickford (Nipper Moran), Sig Ruman (Doctor), Roger Imhof (George Breck), Warner Richmond (Weasel), Jack Wallace (The Kid), James Donlan (Corky).

Baby Face Harrington (MGM)
Producer: Edgar Selwyn. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Nunnally Johnson and Edwin H. Knopf, with dialogue by Charles Lederer, based on the play “Something to Brag About” by Edgar Selywyn and William LeBaron. Cinematographer: Oliver T. Marsh. Editor: William S. Gray. Art director: Cedric Gibbons. Art directors: Howard Campbell, Edwin B. Willis. Sound: Douglas Shearer. Running time: 61 minutes. Released June 19, 1935.
Cast: Charles Butterworth (Willie Harrington), Una Merkel (Millie Harrington), Harvey Stephens (Ronald Lawford), Eugene Pallette (Uncle Henry Parker), Nat Pendleton (Rocky Bannister), Ruth Selwyn (Dorothy), Donald Meek (Mr. Skinner), Dorothy Libaire (Edith), Edward J. Nugent (Albert), Robert Livingston (George), Stanley Fields (“Moider” Mullens).

Every Night at Eight (Paramount)
Producer: Walter Wanger. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Gene Towne and C. Graham Baker, based on the story “Three on a Mike” by Stanley Garvey. Cinematographer: James Van Trees. Editor: W. Donn Hayes. Production designer: Alexander Toluboff. Costume designer: Helen Taylor. Sound: Hugo Grenzbach. Running time: 80 minutes. Filmed at Coldwater Canyon, Los Angeles, CA. Released August 2, 1935.
Cast: George Raft (“Tops” Cardona), Alice Faye (Dixie Foley), Patsy Kelly (Daphne O’Connor), Frances Langford (Susan Moore), Walter Catlett (Master of Ceremonies), Henry Taylor, Jimmy Hollywood, and Eddie Bartell (The Radio Rogues). Walsh received $3,000 per week with an 8-week guarantee. Shooting from May 27 through June 29, 1935.

1936

Klondike Annie (Paramount)
Producer: William LeBaron. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Mae West and Frank Dazey, based on a story by Marion Morgan and George B. Dowell. Cinematographer: George T. Clemens. Editor: Stuart Heisler. Music and lyrics: Sam Coslow, Gene Austin, and Jimmie Johnson. Art directors: Hans Dreier, Bernard Herzbrun. Set decorator: A.E. Freudeman. Sound: Harold Lewis, Louis Mesenkop. Running time: 80 minutes. Released February 21, 1936.
Cast: Mae West (The Frisco Doll/Rose Carlton/Sister Annie Alden), Victor McLaglen (Bull Brackett), Phillip Reed (Inspector Jack Forrest), Helen Jerome Eddy (Sister Annie Alden), Harry Beresford (Brother Bowser), Harold Huber (Chan Lo), Lucile Gleason (Big Tess), Conway Tearle (Vance Palmer).

Big Brown Eyes (Paramount)
Producer: Walter Wanger. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Bert Hanlon and Raoul Walsh, based on a story by James Edward Grant. Cinematographer: George T. Clemens. Editor: Robert L. Simpson. Art director: Alexander Toluboff. Set decorator: Howard Bristol. Costume design: Helen Taylor. Sound: Hugo Grenzbach. Assistant director: David MacDonald. Running time: 77 minutes. Filmed in March 1936. Released April 3, 1936.
Cast: Cary Grant (Det. Sgt. Danny Barr), Joan Bennett (Eve Fallon), Walter Pidgeon (Richard Morey), Lloyd Nolan (Russ Cortig), Alan Baxter (Cary Butler), Marjorie Gateson (Mrs. Chesley Cole), Isabel Jewell (Bessie Blair), Douglas Fowley (Benjamin “Benny” Battle), Henry Brandon (Don Butler).

Spendthrift (Paramount)
Producer: Walter Wanger. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Bert Hanlon, Eric Hatch, Raoul Walsh. Cinematographer: Leon Shamroy. Editor: Robert L. Simpson. Art director: Alexander Toluboff. Costume designer: Helen Taylor. Running time: 70 minutes. Released July 22, 1936.
Cast: Henry Fonda (Townsend Middleton), Pat Peterson (Valerie “Boots” O’Connell), Mary Brian (Sally Barnaby), George Barbier (Uncle Morton Middleton), Edward Brophy (Bill McGuire), Richard Carle (Popsy).

1937

O.H.M.S. (aka You’re in the Army Now) (Gaumont-British)
Executive producer: Geoffrey Barkas. Producer: Sydney Box. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Austin Melford and Bryan Edgar Wallace, after a story by Lesser Samuels and Ralph Gilbert Bettinson. Cinematographer: Roy Kellino. Musical director: Louis Levy. Art directors: Edward Carrick, Ernö Metzner. Costume designer: Marianne. Sound: Sydney Wiles. Running time: 87 minutes. Released April 15, 1937.
Cast: Wallace Ford (Jimmy Tracy), John Mills (Cpl. Bert Dawson), Anna Lee (Sally Briggs), Grace Bradley (Jean Burdett), Frank Cellier (Regimental Sergeant-Major Briggs), Peter Croft (student).

[Unrealized: Walsh arrived back in Hollywood from England on January 23, 1937 to accumulate cast for The Killer, a Criterian picture in England. Wanted to feature Frances Farmer in lead, but production never got underway.]

Jump for Glory (aka When Thief Meets Thief) (United Artists)
Producers: Douglas Fairbanks, Jr. and Marcel Hellman. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Harold French and John Meehan, Jr., based on a novel by Gordon McDonnell. Cinematography: Victor Arménise. Editor: Conrad von Molo. Original music: Percival Mackey. Art director: Edward Carrick. Costume design: Norman Hartnell, Schiaparelli. Running time: 90 minutes. Released June 14, 1937.
Cast: Douglas Fairbanks, Jr. (Ricky Morgan), Valerie Hobson (Glory Fane), Alan Hale (Jim Diall “Col. Fane”), Jack Melford (Thompson), Anthony Ireland (Sir Timothy Haddon), Barbara Everest (Mrs. Nolan), Edward Rigby (Sanders), Esme Percy (Robinson).

Artists and Models (Paramount)
Producer: Adolph Zukor, Lewis E. Gensler. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Walter DeLeon, Lewis E. Gensler, and Frances Martin, from a story by Eugene Thackeray and Sig Herzig. Cinematographer: Victor Milner. Editor: Ellsworth Hoagland. Music: Ted Koehler, Victor Young, Harold Arlen, Frederick Hollander, Leo Robin. Staging director: Vincente Minnelli. Running time: 97 minutes. Released August 13, 1937.
Cast: Jack Benny (Mac Brewster), Ida Lupino (Paula Sewell, Paula Monterey), Richard Arlen (Alan Townsend), Gail Patrick (Cynthia Wentworth), Ben Blue (Jupiter Pluvius), Judy Canova (Toots), Cecil Cunningham (Stella), Donald Meek (Dr. Zimmer), Hedda Hopper (Mrs. Townsend).

Hitting a New High (RKO)
Producer: Jesse L. Lasky. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Gertrude Purcell and John Twist, based on a story by Robert Harari and Maxwell Shane. Cinematographer: J. Roy Hunt. Editor: Desmond Marquette. Music: Andre Kostelanetz. Art director: Van Nest Polglase. Costume designer: Edward Stevenson. Running time: 85 minutes. Released December 24, 1937.
Cast: Lily Pons (Suzette, aka Oogahunga the Bird Girl), Jack Oakie (Corny Davis), John Howard (Jimmy James), Eric Blore (Cedric Cosmo), Edward Everett Horton (Lucius B. Blynn), Eduardo Ciannelli (Andreas Mazzini), Luis Alberni (Luis Marlo), Vinton Hayworth (Carter Haig), Leonard Carey (Jervons).

1938

College Swing (Paramount)
Producer: Adolph Zukor, Lewis E. Gensler. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Walter DeLeon and Francis Martin, from a story by Frederick Hazlitt Brennan. Cinematographer: Victor Milner. Editor: LeRoy Stone. Musical director: Boris Morros. Art directors: Hans Dreier, Ernst Fegté. Costume designer: Edith Head. Sound: Harold Lewis, Howard Lewis. Running time: 86 minutes. Released April 29, 1938.
Cast: George Burns (George Jonas), Gracie Allen (Gracie Alden), Martha Raye (Mabel Grady), Bob Hope (Bud Brady), Edward Everett Horton (Hubert Dash), Florence George (Ginna Ashburn), Betty Grable (Betty), Jackie Coogan (Jackie), John Payne (Martin Bates).

1939

St. Louis Blues (Paramount)
Producer: Jeff Lazarus. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Jack Moffitt, Malcolm Stuart Boylan, and Virginia Van Upp, based on a story by Eleanore Griffin and William Rankin. Cinematographer: Theodor Sparkuhl. Editor: William Shea. Music: Frank Loesser. Art director: Hans Dreier. Running time: 87 minutes. Released February 3, 1939.
Cast: Dorothy Lamout (Norma Malone), Lloyd Nolan (Dave Guerney), Tito Guízar (Rafael San Ramos), Jerome Cowan (Ivan DeBrett), Jessie Ralph (Aunt Tibbie), William Frawley (Maj. Martingale), Mary Parker (Punkins).

The Roaring Twenties (Warner Brothers)
Executive Producer: Hal B. Wallis. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Jerry Wald, Richard Macaulay, and Robert Rossen, based on the story “The World Moves On” by Mark Hellinger. Cinematographer: Ernest Haller. Editor: Jack Killifer. Art director: Max Parker. Makeup: Perc Westmore. Sound: Everett A. Brown. Special effects: Edwin B. DuPar, Byron Haskin. Running time: 106 minutes. Released October 23, 1939.
Cast: James Cagney (Eddie Bartlett), Priscilla Lane (Jean Sherman), Humphrey Bogart (George Hally), Gladys George (Panama Smith), Jeffrey Lynn (Lloyd Hart), Frank McHugh (Danny Green), Paul Kelly (Nick Brown).

1940

Dark Command (Republic)
Producer: Sol C. Siegel. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Grover Jones, Lionel Houser, and F. Hugh Herbert, based on the novel by W.R. Burnett. Cinematographer: Jack A. Marta. Editor: William Morgan. Music: Victor Young. Art director: John Victor Mackay. Running time: 93 minutes. Released April 15, 1940.
Cast: Claire Trevor (Mary McCloud), John Wayne (Bob Seton), Walter Pidgeon (William “Will” Cantrell), Roy Rogers (Fletcher “Fletch” McCloud), George “Gabby” Hayes (Andrew “Doc” Grunch), Porter Hall (Angus McCloud), Marjorie Main (Mrs. Cantrell, aka Mrs. Adams), Raymond Walburn (Judge Bucker), Joe Sawyer (Bushropp), Helen MacKellar (Mrs. Hale).

They Drive by Night (Warner Brothers)
Executive producer: Hal B. Wallis. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Jerry Wald and Richard Macaulay, based on the novel “Long Haul” by A.I. Bezzerides. Cinematographer: Arthur Edeson. Editor: Thomas Richards. Music: Adolph Deutsch. Art director: John Hughes. Costume designer: Milo Anderson. Sound: Oliver S. Garretson. Makeup: Perc Westmore. Special effects: Byron Haskin, Hans F. Koenekamp. Running time: 95 minutes. Released August 3, 1940.
Cast: George Raft (Joe Fabrini), Ann Sheridan (Cassie Hartley), Ida Lupino (Lana Carlsen), Humphrey Bogart (Paul Fabrini), Gale Page (Pearl Fabrini), Alan Hale (Ed Carlsen), Roscoe Karns (Irish McGurn), John Litel (Harry McNamara), George Tobias (George Rondolos).

1941

High Sierra (Warner Brothers)
Executive producer: Hal B. Wallis. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: John Huston and W.R. Burnett, based on the novel by W.R. Burnett. Cinematographer: Tony Gaudio. Editor: Jack Killifer. Music: Adolph Deutsch. Art director: Ted Smith. Costume designer: Milo Anderson. Sound: Dolph Thomas. Makeup: Perc Westmore. Special effects: Byron Haskin, Hans F. Koenekamp. Running time: 110 minutes. Released January 25, 1941.
Cast: Ida Lupino (Marie), Humphrey Bogart (Roy Earle), Alan Curtis (Babe), Arthur Kennedy (Red), Joan Leslie (Velma), Henry Hull (“Doc” Banton), Henry Travers (Pa), Jerome Cowan (Healy).
Remade twice, as “Colorado Territory” (Walsh, 1949) and “I Died a Thousand Times” (Stuart Heisler, 1955).

The Strawberry Blonde (Warner Brothers)
Producers: Hal B. Wallis, William Cagney. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Julius J. Epstein and Philip G. Epstein, based on the play “One Sunday Afternoon” by James Hagan. Cinematography: James Wong Howe. Editor: William Holmes. Music: Heinz Roemheld. Art director: Robert M. Haas. Costume design: Orry-Kelly. Sound: Robert B. Lee. Makeup: Perc Westmore. Special effects: Willard Van Enger. Running time: 99 minutes. Released February 22, 1941.
Cast: James Cagney (Biff Grimes), Olivia de Havilland (Amy Lind), Rita Hayworth (Virginia Brush), Alan Hale (Old Man Grimes), Jack Carson (Hugo Barnstead), George Tobias (Nicholas Pappalas), Una O’Connor (Mrs. Mulcahey), George Reeves (Harold).

Manpower (Warner Brothers)
Producer: Hal B. Wallis, Mark Hellinger, Jack Saper. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Richard Macaulay, Jerry Wald. Cinematographer: Ernest Haller. Editor: Ralph Dawson. Music: Adolph Deutsch. Art director: Max Parker. Costume designer: Milo Anderson. Sound: Dolph Thomas. Makeup: Perc Westmore. Special effects: Byron Haskin, Hans F. Koenekamp. Running time: 104 minutes. Released August 9, 1941.
Cast: Edward G. Robinson (Hank “Gimpy” McHenry), Marlene Dietrich (Fay Duval), George Raft (Johnny Marshall), Alan Hale (Jumbo Wells), Frank McHugh (Omaha), Eve Arden (Dolly), Barton MacLane (Smiley Quinn), Ward Bond (Eddie Adams).

They Died with Their Boots On (Warner Brothers)
Producers: Hal B. Wallis, Robert Fellows. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Wally Kline, Aeneas MacKenzie. Cinematographer: Bert Glennon. Editor: William Holmes. Music: Max Steiner. Art director: John Hughes. Costume design: Milo Anderson. Sound: Dolph Thomas. Makeup: Perc Westmore. Running time: 140 minutes. Shot in Pasadena, Calabasas, and Chatsworth, CA. Released January 1, 1942.
Cast: Errol Flynn (George Armstrong Custer), Olivia de Havilland (Elizabeth Bacon), Arthur Kennedy (Ned Sharp), Charley Grapewin (California Joe), Gene Lockhart (Samuel Bacon, Esq.), Anthony Quinn (Crazy Horse), Stanley Ridges (Maj. Romulus Taipe), John Litel (Gen. Phil Sheridan), Walter Hampden (William Sharp), Sydney Greenstreet (Lt. Gen. Winfield Scott), Hattie McDaniel (Callie).

1942

Desperate Journey (Warner Brothers)
Producers: Hal B. Wallis, Jack Saper. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Arthur T. Horman. Cinematographer: Bert Glennon. Editor: Rudi Fehr. Music: Max Steiner. Art director: Carl Jules Weyl. Costume designer: Milo Anderson. Sound: C.A. Riggs. Makeup: Perc Westmore. Running time: 107 minutes. Released September 26, 1942.
Cast: Errol Flynn (Flight Lt. Terrence “Terry” Forbes), Ronald Reagan (Flying Officer Johnny Hammond), Nancy Coleman (Kaethe Brahms), Raymond Massey (Major Otto Baumeister), Alan Hale (Flight Sergeant Kirk Edwards), Arthur Kennedy (Flying Officer Jed Forrest), Ronald Sinclair (Flight Sergeant Lloyd Hollis).

Gentleman Jim (Warner Brothers)
Producer: Robert Buckner. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Vincent Lawrence and Horace McCoy, based on James J. Corbett’s autobiography “The Roar of the Crowd.” Cinematographer: Sidney Hickox. Editor: Jack Killifer. Music: Heinz Roemheld. Art director: Ted Smith. Set decorator: Clarence Steensen. Costume designer: Milo Anderson. Sound: C.A. Riggs. Makeup: Perc Westmore. Running time: 104 minutes. Released November 25, 1942.
Cast: Errol Flynn (James J. Corbett/Gentleman Jim), Alexis Smith (Victoria Ware), Jack Carson (Walter Lowrie), Alan Hale (Pat Corbett), John Loder (Carlton De Witt), William Frawley (Billy Delaney).

1943

Background to Danger (Warner Brothers)
Executive producer: Jack L. Warner. Producer: Jerry Wald. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: W.R. Burnett, based on the novel by Eric Ambler. Cinematographer: Tony Gaudio. Editor: Jack Killifer. Music: Friedrich Hollaender. Art director: Hugh Reticker. Set decorator: Casey Roberts. Costume designer: Milo Anderson. Sound: Dolph Thomas. Makeup: Perc Westmore. Special effects: Warren Lynch, Willard Van Enger. Running time: 80 minutes. Released July 3, 1943.
Cast: George Raft (Joe Barton), Brenda Marshall (Tamara Zaleshoff), Sydney Greenstreet (Colonel Robinson), Peter Lorre (Nikolai Zaleshoff), Osa Massen (Ana Remzi), Turhab Bey (Hassan).

Northern Pursuit (Warner Brothers)
Executive producer: Jack L. Warner. Producer: Jack Chertok. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Frank Gruber and Alvah Bessie, based on the story “5,000 Trojan Horses” by Leslie T. White. Cinematographer: Sidney Hickox, Editor: Jack Killifer. Music: Adolph Deutsch. Art director: Leo K. Kuter. Set decorator: Casey Roberts. Costume designer: Leah Rhodes. Sound: Stanley Jones. Makeup: Perc Westmore. Special effects: Roy Davidson. Running time: 94 minutes. Shot in Sun Valley, Idaho. Released November 13, 1943.
Cast: Errol Flynn (Cpl. Steve Wagner), Julie Bishop (Laura McBain), Helmut Dantine (Col. Hugo von Keller), John Ridgely (Jim Austin), Gene Lockhart (Ernst), Tom Tully (Inspector Barnett).

1944

Uncertain Glory (Warner Brothers)
Executive producer: Jack L. Warner. Producer: Robert Buckner. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: László Vadnay and Max Brand, based on a story by Joe May and László Vadnay. Cinematographer: Sidney Hickox. Editor: George Amy. Music: Adolph Deutsch. Art director: Robert M. Haas. Set decorator: Walter Tilford. Sound: Oliver S. Garretson. Makeup: Perc Westmore. Special effects: Roy Davidson. Running time: 102 minutes. Released April 22, 1944.
Cast: Errol Flynn (Jean Picard), Paul Lukas (Insp. Marcel Bonet), Lucile Watson (Mme. Maret), Faye Emerson (Louise), James Flavin (Capt. of Mobile Guard), Douglass Dumbrille (Police Commissioner LaFarge), Jean Sullivan (Marianne), Dennis Hoey (Father Le Clerc), Odette Myrtil (Mme. Bonet), Sheldon Leonard (Henri Duval), Francis Pierlot (Father La Borde).

1945

Objective Burma! (Warner Brothers)
Executive producer: Jack L. Warner. Producer: Jerry Wald. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay by Ranald MacDougall and Lester Cole, based on a story by Alvah Bessie. Cinematographer: James Wong Howe. Editor: George Amy. Music: Franz Waxman. Art director: Ted Smith. Set decorator: Jack McConaghy. Sound: C.A. Riggs. Makeup: Perc Westmore. Special effects: Edwin B. DuPar. Running time: 142 minutes. Shot in Pasadena, Palm Springs, Whittier Park, and Santa Anita, CA. Released February 17, 1945.
Cast: Errol Flynn (Capt. Nelson), James Brown (Sgt. Treacy), William Prince (Lt. Sid Jacobs), George Tobias (Cpl. Gabby Gordon), Henry Hull (Mark Williams), Warner Anderson (Col. J. Carter), John Alvin (Hogan), Mark Stevens (Lt. Barker), Richard Erdman (Pvt. Nebraska Hooper).

Salty O’Rourke (Paramount)
Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Milton Holmes. Cinematographer: Theodor Sparkuhl. Editor: William Shea. Music: Robert Emmett Dolan. Art directors: Haldane Douglas, Hans Dreier. Set decorator: John MacNeil. Costume design: Dorothy O’Hara. Sound: Earl S. Hayman, Walter Oberst. Makeup: Wally Westmore. Assistant director: Oscar Rudolph. Running time: 100 minutes. Released April 25, 1945.
Cast: Alan Ladd (Salty O’Rourke), Gail Russell (Barbara Brooks), William Demarest (Smitty), Stanley Clements (Johnny Cates), Bruce Cabot (Doc Baxter), Spring Byington (Mrs. Brooks).

The Horn Blows at Midnight (Warner Brothers)
Executive producer: Jack L. Warner. Producer: Mark Hellinger. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Sam Hellman and James V. Kern, based on a story by Aubrey Wisberg. Cinematographer: Sidney Hickox. Editor: Irene Morra. Music: Franz Waxman. Art director: Hugh Reticker. Set decorator: Clarence Steensen. Costume designer: Milo Anderson. Sound: Gerald W. Alexander, Charles David Forrest, Stanley Jones, Robert G. Wayne. Makeup: Perc Westmore. Running time: 80 minutes. Released April 28, 1945
Cast: Jack Benny (Athanael), Alexis Smith (Elizabeth), Dolores Moran (Violinist/Fran Blackstone), Allyn Joslyn (Second Trumpeter/Osidro), Reginald Gardiner (Composer/Archie Dexter), Guy Kibbee (Radio director/the Chief), John Alexander (First trumpeter/Doremus), Franklin Pangborn (Radio Engineer/Sloan), Margaret Dumot (Mme Traviata/Miss Rodholder), Robert Blake (Junior Pulplinsky).

1946

The Man I Love (Warner Brothers)
Executive producer: Jack L. Warner. Producer: Arnold Albert. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Jo Pagano and Catherine Turney, based on the novel “Night Shift” by Maritta M. Wolff. Cinematographer: Sidney Hickox. Editor: Owen Marks. Music: George Gershwin. Art director: Stanley Fleischer. Set decorator: Eddie Edwards. Costume design: Milo Anderson. Sound: Dolph Thomas, Charles David Forrest. Makeup: Perc Westmore. Special effects: Harry Barndollar, Edwin B. DuPar. Running time: 96 minutes. Released January 11, 1947.
Cast: Ida Lupino (Petey Brown), Robert Alda (Nicky Toresca), Andrea King (Sally Otis), Martha Vickers (Virginia “Ginny” Brown), Bruce Bennett (San Thomas), Alan Hale (Riley), Dolores Moran (Gloria O’Connor).

1947

Pursued (Warner Brothers)
Producer: Milton Sperling. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Niven Busch. Cinematographer: James Wong Howe. Editor: Christian Nyby. Music: Max Steiner. Art director: Ted Smith. Set decorator: Jack McConaghy. Sound: Francis J. Scheid. Makeup: Perc Westmore. Running time: 101 minutes. Shot in Gallup, NM. Released March 2, 1947.
Cast: Teresa Wright (Thor), Robert Mitchum (Jeb), Judith Anderson (Mrs. Callum), Dean Jagger (Grant), Alan Hale (Jake Dingle), John Rodney (Adam), Harry Carey, Jr. (Prentice).

Cheyenne (Warner Brothers)
Producer: Robert Buckner. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Alan Le May and Thames Williamson, based on a story by Paul Wellman. Cinematographer: Sidney Hickox. Editor: Christian Nyby. Music: Max Steiner. Art director: Ted Smith. Set decorator: Jack McConaghy. Costume design: Milo Anderson. Sound: Oliver S. Garretson. Makeup: Perc Westmore. Assistant director: Ridgeway Callow. Special effects: Hans F. Koenekamp, William McGann. Running time: 100 minutes. Shot in Arizona. Released June 6, 1947.
Cast: Dennis Morgan (James Wylie), Jane Wyman (Ann Kincaid), Janis Paige (Emily Carson), Bruce Bennett (Ed Landers), Alan Hale (Fred Durkin), Arthur Kennedy (The Sundance Kid), John Ridgely (Chalkeye), Barton MacLane (Webb Yancey).

1948

Silver River (Warner Brothers)
Executive producer: Jack L. Warner. Producer: Owen Crump. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Stephen Longstreet and Harriet Frank, Jr., based on a novel by Stephen Longstreet. Cinematographer: Sidney Hickox. Editor: Alan Crosland, Jr. Music: Max Steiner. Art director: Ted Smith. Set decorator: William Wallace. Costume designer: Marjorie Best. Sound: Francis J. Scheid. Makeup: Perc Westmore. Special effects: Edwin B. DuPar, William McGann. Running time: 110 minutes. Shot in Bishop, CA. Released May 29, 1948.
Cast: Errol Flynn (Mike McComb), Ann Sheridan (Georgia Moore), Thomas Mitchell (John Plato Beck), Bruce Bennett (Stanley Moore), Tom D’Andrea (“Pistol” Porter), Barton MacLane (“Banjo” Sweeney).

Fighter Squadron (Warner Brothers)
Producer: Seton I. Miller. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Seton I. Miller, Martin Rackin. Cinematographers: Wilfred M. Cline, Sidney Hickox. Editor: Christian Nyby. Music: Max Steiner. Art director: Ted Smith. Set decorator: Lyle B. Reifsnider. Sound: Leslie G. Hewitt. Special effects: Roy Davidson, John Holden, Hans F. Koenekamp. Assistant director: Russell Saunders. Running time: 96 minutes. Shot at the Oscada Air Base at Lake Huron. Released November 27, 1948.
Cast: Edmund O’Brien (Maj. Ed Hardin), Robert Stack (Cpt. Stu Hamilton), John Rodney (Col. Bill Brickley), Tom D’Andrea (Sgt. Dolan), Henry Hull (Maj. Gen. Mike McCready), James Holden (Lt. Tennessee Atkins), Walter Reed (Cpt. Duke Chappell), Shepperd Strudwick (Brig. Gen. M. Gilbert), Rock Hudson (uncredited).

One Sunday Afternoon (Warner Brothers)
Producer: Jerry Wald. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Robert L. Richards, based on the play by James Hagan. Cinematographers: Wilfred M. Cline, Sidney Hickox. Editor: Christian Nyby. Music: Ralph Blane. Art director: Anton Grot. Set decorator: Fred M. MacLean. Costume design: Leah Rhodes. Sound: Leslie G. Hewitt. Assistant director: Russell Saunders. Running time: 90 minutes. Released January 1, 1949.
Cast: Dennis Morgan (Timothy “Biff” Grimes), Janis Paige (Virginia Brush), Don DeFore (Hugo Barnstead), Dorothy Malone (Amy Lind), Ben Blue (Nick), Oscar O’Shea (Toby) Alan Hale, Jr. (Marty).
Musical version of “The Strawberry Blonde.”

1949

Colorado Territory (Warner Brothers)
Producer: Anthony Veiller. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Edmund H. North and John Twist, based on the novel “High Sierra” by W.R. Burnett (uncredited). Cinematographer: Sidney Hickox. Editor: Owen Marks. Music: David Buttolph. Art director: Ted Smith. Set decorator: Fred M. MacLean. Costume designer: Leah Rhodes. Sound: Leslie G. Hewitt. Makeup: Perc Westmore. Special effects. Hans F. Koenekamp, William C. McGann. Running time: 94 minutes. Shot in Gallup, NM. Released June 11, 1949.
Cast: Joel McCrea (Wes McQueen), Virginia May (Colorado Carson), Dorothy Malone (Julie Ann Winslow), Henry Hull (Fred Winslow), John Archer (Reno Blake), James Mitchell (Duke Harris).

White Heat (Warner Brothers)
Producer: Louis F. Edelman. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Ivan Goff and Ben Roberts, based on a story by Virginia Kellogg. Cinematographer: Sidney Hickox. Editor: Owen Marks. Music: Max Steiner. Art director: Edward Carrère. Set decorator: Fred M. MacLean. Sound: Leslie G. Hewitt. Makeup: Perc Westmore. Special effects: Roy Davidson. Running time: 114 minutes. Shot at the Santa Susanna Mountains, San Pedro, CA. Released September 2, 1949.
Cast: James Cagney (Arthur “Cody” Jarrett), Virginia Mayo (Verna Jarrett), Edmond O’Brien (Vic Pardo), Margaret Wycherly (Ma Jarrett), Steve Cochran (Big Ed Somers), John Archer (Philip Evans), Wally Cassel (“Cotton” Valletti), Fred Clark (Daniel Winston).

1951

The Enforcer (Warner Brothers)
Producer: Milton Sperling. Director: Bretaigne Windust, Raoul Walsh (uncredited). Screenplay: Martin Rackin. Cinematographer: Robert Burks. Editor: Fred Allen. Music: David Buttolph. Art director: Charles H. Clarke. Set decorator: William L. Kuehl. Sound: Dolph Thomas. Running time: 87 minutes.
Cast: Humphrey Bogart (Dist. Atty. Martin Ferguson), Zero Mostel (Big Babe Lazick), Ted de Corsia (Joseph Rico), Everett Sloane (Albert Mendoza), Roy Roberts (Capt. Frank Nelson), Michael Tolan (James “Duke” Malloy).
Walsh replaced Windust after several days of shooting.

Along the Great Divide (Warner Brothers)
Producer: Anthony Veiller. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Walter Doniger and Lewis Meltzer, based on a story by Walter Doniger. Cinematographer: Sidney Hickox. Editor: Thomas Reilly. Music: David Buttolph. Art director: Edward Carrere. Set decorator: G.W. Berntsen. Costume designer: Marjorie Best. Sound: Leslie G. Hewitt. Makeup: Gordon Bau. Assistant director: Oren Haglund. Running time: 88 minutes. Shot at Lone Pine, Mojave Desert, CA. Released June 2, 1951.
Cast: Kirk Douglas (Marshal Len Merrick), Virginia May(Ann Keith), John Agar (Billy Shear), Walter Brennan (Tim “Pop” Keith), Ray Teal (Deputy Lou Gray), Hugh Sanders (Frank Newcombe), Morris Ankrum (Ed Roden).

Captain Horatio Hornblower R.N. (Warner Brothers)
Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Ivan Goff, Ben Roberts, and Aeneas MacKenzie; adaptation by C.S. Forester, from his novel. Cinematographer: Guy Green. Editor: Jack Harris. Music: Robert Farnon. Art director: Thomas N. Morahan. Costume designers: Sheila Graham, Thomas N. Morahan. Sound: Harold V. King. Makeup: Tony Sforzini. Special effects: Harry Barndollar, George Blackwell, Arthur Rhoades, Cliff Richardson. Running time: 117 minutes. Shot at Villefranche-sur-mer and Cagnes-sur-mer, and Grande-Bretagne, France. Released September 13, 1951.
Cast: Gregory Peck (Capt. Horatio Hornblower), Virginia Mayo (Lady Barbara Wellesley), Robert Beatty (Lt. William Bush), Moultrie Kelsall (Lt. Crystal), Terence Morgan (2nd Lt. Gerard).

Distant Drums (Warner Brothers)
Producer: Milton Sperling. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Niven Busch and Martin Rackin, based on a story by Niven Busch. Cinematographer: Sidney Hickox. Editor: Folmar Blangsted. Music: Max Steiner. Art director: Douglas Bacon. Set decorator: William Wallace. Sound: Oliver S. Garretson. Costume designer: Marjorie Best. Makeup: Gordon Bau. Running time: 101 minutes. Shot in the Everglades, FL. Released December 29, 1951.
Cast: Gary Cooper (Capt. Quincy Wyatt), Mari Aldon (Judy Beckett), Richard Webb (Lt. Richard Tufts), Ray Teal (Pvt. Mohair), Arthur Hunnicutt (Monk), Robert Barrat (Gen. Zachary Taylor).

1952

Glory Alley (MGM)
Producer: Nicholas Nayfack. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Art Cohn. Cinematographer: William H. Daniels. Editor: Gene Ruggiero. Art directors: Malcolm Brown, Cedric Gibbons. Set decorators: F. Keogh Gleason, Edwin B. Willis. Sound: Douglas Shearer. Costume designer: Helen Rose. Special effects: A. Arnold Gillespie. Running time: 79 minutes. Released June 6, 1952.
Cast: Ralph Meeker (Socks Barbarrosa), Leslie Caron (Angela Evans), Kurt Kasznar (Gus “The Judge” Evans), Gilbert Roland (Peppi Donnato), John McIntire (Gabe Jordan/Narrator), Louis Armstrong (Shadow Johnson).

The World in his Arms (Universal)
Producer: Aaron Rosenberg. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Borden Chase (with dialogue by Horace McCoy), based on the novel by Rex Beach. Cinematographer: Russell Metty. Editor: Frank Gross. Music: Frank Skinner. Art directors: Alexander Golitzen, Bernard Herzbrun. Set decorators: Russell A. Gausman, Julia Heron. Costume designer: Bill Thomas. Sound: Leslie I. Carey, Corson Jewett. Makeup: Bud Westmore. Special effects: David S. Horsley. Running time: 104 minutes. Shot in Alaska and Nova Scotia. Released October 9, 1952.
Cast: Gregory Peck (Capt. Jonathan Clark), Ann Blyth (Countess Marina Selanova), Anthony Quinn (Portugee), John McIntire (Deacon Greathouse), Carl Esmond (Prince Semyon), Andrea King (Mamie), Eugenie Leontovich (Anna Selanova), Sig Ruman (General Ivan Vorashilov).

Blackbeard the Pirate (RKO)
Producer: Edmund Grainger. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Alan Le May, from a story by DeVallon Scott. Cinematographer: William E. Snyder. Editor: Ralph Dawson. Music: Victor Young. Art directors: Albert S. D’Agostino, Jack Oakey. Set decorators: Darrell Silvera, John Sturtevant. Costume designer: Michael Woulfe. Sound: Frank McWhorter, Clem Portman. Makeup: Mel Berns. Visual effects: Harold E. Wellmann. Assistant director: James E. Casey. Running time: 98 minutes. Released December 24, 1952.
Cast: Robert Newton (Edward Teach/Blackbeard), Linda Darnell (Edwina Mansfield), William Bendix (Ben Worley), Keith Andes (Robert Maynard), Torin Thatcher (Sir Henry Morgan), Irene Ryan (Alvina), Alan Mowbray (Noll), Richard Egan (Briggs).

The Lawless Breed (Universal)
Producer: William Alland. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Bernard Gordon, from a story by William Alland based on the life story of John Wesley Hardin as written by himself. Cinematographer: Irving Glassberg. Editor: Frank Gross. Music: Joseph Gershenson. Art directors: Bernard Herzbrun, Richard H. Riedel. Set decorators: Oliver Emert, Russell A. Gausman. Costume designer: Rosemary Odell. Sound: Leslie I. Carey, Corson Jewett. Makeup: Bud Westmore. Assistant director: William Holland. Running time: 83 minutes. Released January 3, 1953.
Cast: Rock Hudson (John Wesley Hardin), Julie Adams (Rosie), Mary Castle (Jane Brown), John McIntire (J.G. Hardin/John Clements), Hugh O’Brian (Ike Hanley), Dennis Weaver (Jim Clements), Forrest Lewis (Zeke Jenkins), Lee Van Cleef (Dick Hanley).

1953

Sea Devils (RKO)
Producer: David E. Rose. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Borden Chase, based on the novel “Les Travailleurs de la Mer” by Victor Hugo. Cinematographer: Wilkie Cooper. Editor: John Seabourne, Jr. Music: Richard Addinsell. Production designer: Wilfred Shingleton. Art director: Wilfred Shingleton. Costume designers: Elizabeth Agombar, R. St. John Roper. Sound: W.H. Lindop. Makeup: Jim Hydes. Assistant director: Philip Shipway. Running time: 91 minutes. Shot on the Isle of Jersey, and in Brittany and the Normandy coast, France. Released May 23, 1953.
Cast: Yvonne De Carlo (Droucette), Rock Hudson (Gilliatt), Maxwell Reed (Rantaine), Denis O’Dea (Lethierry), Michael Goodliffe (Ragan), Bryan Forbes (Willie), Jacques B. Brunius (Fouche), Gérard Oury (Napoleon).

A Lion is in the Streets (Warner Brothers)
Producer: William Cagney. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Luther Davis, based on the novel by Andria Locke Langley. Cinematographer: Harry Stradling Jr. Editor: George Amy. Music: Franz Waxman. Production designer: Wiard Ihnen. Art director: William Kissell. Set decorators: Wiard Ihnen, Fred M. MacLean. Sound: Larry Gannon, John K. Kean. Wardrobe: Kay Nelson. Makeup: Otis Malcom. Special effects: Roscoe Kline. Assistant director: William Kissell. Running time: 88 minutes. Released September 23, 1953.
Cast: James Cagney (Hank Martin), Barbara Hale (Verity Wade), Anne Francis (Flamingo McManamee), Warner Anderson (Jules Bolduc), John McIntire (Jeb Brown), Jeanne Cagney (Jennie Brown), Lon Chaney, Jr. (Spurge McManamee).

Gun Fury (Columbia)
Producer: Lewis J. Rachmil. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Irving Wallace and Roy Huggins, based on the novel “Ten Against Caesar” by Kathleen B. Geoorge and Robert A. Granger. Cinematographer: Lester White. Editors: James Sweeney, Jerome Thomas. Music: Mischa Bakaleinikoff. Art director: Ross Bellah. Set decorator: James Crowe. Sound: J.S. Westmoreland. Assistant director: Jack Corrick. Running time: 83 minutes. Shot in Sedona, AZ. Released November 11, 1953.
Cast: Rock Hudson (Ben Warren), Donna Reed (Jennifer Ballard), Philip Carey (Frank Slayton), Roberta Haynes (Estella Morales), Leo Gordon (Tom Burgess), Lee Marvin (Blinky).

1954

Saskatchewan (Universal)
Producer: Aaron Rosenberg. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Gil Doud. Cinematographer: John F. Seitz. Editor: Frank Goss. Music: Joseph Gershenson. Art directors: Bernard Herzbrun, Richard H. Riedel. Set decorators: John P. Austin, Russell A. Gausman. Costume designer: Bill Thomas. Sound: Leslie I. Carey. Makeup: Bud Westmore. Assistant director: Frank Shaw. Running time: 87 minutes. Filmed at Banff National Park, Albert, Canada. Released March 30, 1954.
Cast: Alan Ladd (Thomas O’Rourke), Shelley Winters (Grace Markey), J. Carrol Naish (Batouche), Hugh O’Brian (Carl Smith), Robert Douglas (Benton), George J. Lewis (Lawson), Richard Long (Patrick J. Scanlon), Jay Silverheels (Cajou).

1955

Battle Cry (Warner Brothers)
Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Leon Uris, based on his novel. Cinematographer: Sidney Hickox. Editor: William Ziegler. Music: Max Steiner. Art director: John Beckman. Set decorator: William Wallace. Sound: Francis J. Scheid. Wardrobe: Mossy Mabry. Makeup: Gordon Bau. Assistant directors: William Kissell, Russell Saunders. Running time: 149 minutes. Filmed at Camp Pendleton, CA, and Vieques Island, PR. Released February 2, 1955.
Cast: Van Heflin (Maj. Sam Huxley), Aldo Ray (Pvt. Andy Hookens), Mona Freeman (Kathy), Nancy Olson (Mrs. Pat Rogers), James Whitmore (Sgt. Mac/Narrator), Raymond Massey (Maj. Gen. Snipes), Tab Hunter (Pvt. Cpl. Danny Forrester), Dorothy Malone (Mrs. Elaine Yarborough), Anne Francis (Rae).

The Tall Men (20th Century Fox)
Producers: William Bacher, William Hawks. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Sydney Boehm and Frank S. Nugent, based on the novel by Clay Fisher. Cinematographer: Leo Tover. Editor: Louis R. Loeffler. Music: Victor Young. Art directors: Mark-Lee Kirk, Lyle R. Wheeler. Set decorators: Chester Bayhi, Walter M. Scott. Sound: Harry M. Leonard, John D. Stack. Costumes: Travilla. Makeup: Ben Nye. Special effects: Ray Kellogg. Assistant director: Stanley Hough. Running time: 122 minutes. Filmed in Durango, Mexico, and Sun Valley, ID. Released September 22, 1955.
Cast: Clark Gable (Col. Ben Allison), Jane Russell (Nella Turner), Robert Ryan (Nathan Stark), Cameron Mitchell (Clint Allison), Juan Garcia (Luis), Harry Shannon (Sam), Emile Meyer (Chickasaw Charlie), Steve Darrell (Col. Norris), Will Wright (Gus).

1956

The Revolt of Mamie Stover (20th Century Fox)
Producer: Buddy Adler. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Sydney Boehm, based on the novel by William Bradford Huie. Cinematographer: Leo Tover. Editor: Louis R. Loeffler. Music: Hugo Friedhofer. Art directors: Mark-Lee Kirk, Lyle R. Wheeler. Costume designer: Travilla. Sound: W.D. Flick, Harry M. Leonard. Assistant director: Joseph E. Rickards. Running time: 93 minutes. Filmed in Honolulu and Oahu, HI. Released May 11, 1956.
Cast: Jane Russell (Mamie Stover), Richard Egan (Jim Blair), Joan Leslie (Annalee Johnson), Agnes Moorehead (Bertha Parchman), Jorja Curtright (Jackie), Michael Pate (Harry Adkins), Richard Coogan (Cpt. Eldon Sumac), Alan Reed (Cpt. Gorecki).

The King and Four Queens (United Artists)
Producer: David Hempstead. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Margaret Fitts and Richard Alan Simmons. Cinematographer: Lucien Ballard. Editor: Howard Bretherton. Music: Alex North. Production designer: Wiard Ihnen. Set decorator: Victor A. Gangelin. Costume designer: Renie. Sound: Jack Solomon. Assistant director: Tom Connors, Jr. time: 84 minutes. Filmed in St. George, UT. Released December 21, 1956.
Cast: Clark Gable (Dan Kehoe), Eleanor Parker (Sabina McDade), Jean Wiles (Ruby McDade), Barbara Nicholes (Birdie McDade), Sara Shane (Oralie McDade), Roy Roberts (Sheriff Tom Larrabee), Arthur Shields (Padre).

1957

Band of Angels (Warner Brothers)
Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: John Twist, Ivan Goff, and Ben Roberts, based on the novel by Robert Penn Warren. Cinematographer: Lucien Ballard. Editor: Folmar Blangsted. Music: Max Steiner. Art director: Franz Bachelin. Set decorator: William Wallace. Costume designer: Marjorie Best. Sound: Francis E. Stahl. Makeup: Gordon Bau. Assistant directors: Al Alleborn, Russell Saunders. Running time: 126 minutes. Shot in Baton Rouge, LA. Released August 3, 1957.
Cast: Clark Gable (Hamish Bond), Yvonne De Carlo (Amantha Starr), Sidney Poitier (Rau-Ru), Efrem Zimbalist, Jr. (Lt. Ethan Sears), Rex Reason (Cpt. Seth Parton), Patric Knowles (Charles de Marigny), Torin Thatcher (Cpt. Canavan), Andrea King (Miss Idell).

1958

The Naked and the Dead (RKO)
Producer: Paul Gregory. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Denis Sanders and Terry Sanders, based on the novel by Norman Mailer. Cinematographer: Joseph LaShelle. Editor: Arthur P. Schmidt. Music: Bernard Herrmann. Art director: Ted Haworth. Set decorator: William L. Kuehl. Costume designer: Oscar Rodriguez. Sound: Robert B. Lee. Makeup: Allan Snyder. Assistant director: Russell Saunders. Running time: 135 minutes. Shot in Panama. Released August 6, 1958.
Cast: Aldo Ray (Sgt. Sam Croft), Cliff Robertson (Lt. Robert Hearn), Raymond Massey (Gen. Cummings), Lil St. Cyr (Willie Mae aka Lily), Barbara Nichols (Mildred Croft), William Campbell (Brown), Richard Jaeckel (Gallagher), James Best (Ridges), Joey Bishop (Roth), Jerry Paris (Goldstein).

The Sheriff of Fractured Jaw (20th Century Fox)
Producer: Daniel M. Angel. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Arthur Dales, based on a story by Jacob Hay. Cinematographer: Otto Heller. Editor: John Shirley. Music: Robert Farnon. Art director: Bernard Robinson. Costume designer: Julie Harris. Sound: Dudley Messenger. Makeup: George Partleton. Assistant director: Jack Causey. Running time: 110 minutes. Released in UK October 28, 1958.
Cast: Kenneth Moore (Jonathan Tibbs), Jayne Mansfield (Kate), Henry Hull (Major Masters), Bruce Cabot (Jack), Ronald Squire (Toynbee), William Campbell (Keeno), Sidney James (The drunk), Reed Rouen (Claybourne), Charles Irwin (Luke).

1959

A Private’s Affair (20th Century Fox)
Producer: David Weisbart. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Winston Miller, from a story by Ray Livingston Murphy. Cinematographer: Charles G. Clarke. Editor: Dorothy Spencer. Music: Cyril J. Mockbridge. Art directors: Walter Simonds, Lyle R. Wheeler. Set decorators: Stuart A. Reiss, Walter M. Scott. Costume designer: Adele Balkan. Sound: Bernard Freericks, Harry M. Leonard. Makeup: Ben Nye. Assistant director: Hal Herman. Running time: 92 minutes. Released August 14, 1959.
Cast: Sal Mineo (Luigi Maresi), Christine Carère (Marie), Barry Coe (Jerry Morgan), Barbara Eden (Sgt. Katie Mulligan), Gary Crosby (Mike Conroy), Terry Moore (Louise Wright), Jim Backus (Jim Gordon), Jessie Royce Landis (Elizabeth T. Chapman), Robert Burton (Gen. Hargrave).

1960

Esther and the King (20th Century Fox)
Producer: Raoul Walsh. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Raoul Walsh, Michael Elkins. Cinematographer: Mario Bava. Editor: Jerry Webb. Art director: Giorgio Giovannini. Music: Angelo Francesco Lavagnino, Roberto Nicolosi. Makeup: Euclide Santoli. Assistant director: Ottavio Oppo. Running time: 110 minutes. Filmed at Titanus Appia Studios, Rome, Lazio, Italy. Released December 14, 1960.
Cast: Joan Collins (Esther), Richard Egan (King Ahasuerus), Denis O’Dea (Mordecai), Sergio Fantoni (Haman), Rik Battaglia (Simon), Renato Baldini (Klydrathes), Gabriele Tinti (Samual), Rosalba Neri (Keresh), Robert Buchanan (Hegai), Daniela Rocca (Queen Vashti), Folco Lulli (Tobiah).

1961

Marines, Let’s Go (20th Century Fox)
Producer: Raoul Walsh. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: John Twist, from a story by Raoul Walsh. Cinematographer: Lucien Ballard. Editor: Robert L. Simpson. Music: Irving Gertz. Art directors: Jack Martin Smith, Alfred Ybarra. Sound: Warren B. Delaplain, Bernard Freericks. Makeup: Ben Nye. Assistant director: Milton Carter. Running time: 103 minutes. Filmed in Kyoto, Japan. Released August 15, 1961.
Cast: Tom Tryon (Pfc. Skip Roth), David Hedison (Pfc. Dave Chatfield), Tom Reese (Pfc. Desmond “Let’s Go” McCaffrey), Linda Hutchings (Grace Blake), William Tyler (Pvt. Russ Waller), Barbara Stuart (Ina Baxter), David Brandon (Pvt. Newt Levels), Steve Baylor (Pvt. Chase).

1964

A Distant Trumpet (Warner Brothers)
Producer: William H. Wright. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: John Twist, based on the novel by Paul Horgan. Cinematographer: William Clothier. Editor: David Wages. Music: Max Steiner. Art director: William L. Campbell. Set decorator: William L. Kuehl. Costume designer: Howard Shoup. Sound: Francis E. Stahl. Makeup: Gordon Bau. Assistant directors: William Kissell, Russell Saunders. Running time: 116 minutes. Filmed at Gallup and Red Rock State Park, NM, and Painted Desert, AZ. Released May 30, 1964.
Cast: Troy Donahue (2nd Lt. Matthew “Matt” Hazard), Suzanne Pleshette (Kitty Mainwarring), Diane McBain (Laura Frelief), James Gregory (Maj. Gen. Alexander Upton Quaint), William Reynolds (1st Lt. Teddy Mainwarring), Claude Akins (Seely Jones), Kent Smith (Secretary of War), Judson Pratt (Capt. Cedric Gray, MD).

 

 

Walsh as collaborator

1915

Home from the Sea (Reliance/Majestic)
Supervising producer: D.W. Griffith. Director: Raoul Walsh. Running time: 1 r.
Cast: Raoul Walsh, Ralph Lewis, Francelia Billington

The Burned Hand (Majestic)
Director: Tod Browning. Running time: 2 r.
Cast: Miriam Cooper, William Hinckley, W.E. Lowry, Cora Drew.
Sometimes erroneously attributed to Walsh.

Ghosts (Mutual)
Producer: D.W. Griffith. Director: George Nichols. Screenplay: Russell E. Smith, from the play “Gengangere” by Henrik Ibsen. Running time: 5 r.
Cast: Henry B. Walthall (Captain Arling), Mary Alden (Helen Arling), Loretta Blake (Regina), Juanita Archer (Johanna).
Sometimes erroneously attributed to Walsh, or to John Emerson.

Peer Gynt (Paramount)
Producer: Oliver Morosco. Screenplay: Oscar Apfel, after the play by Henrik Ibsen. Released September 16, 1915.
Cast: Cyril Maude (Peer Gynt), Myrtle Steadman (Solveig), Fanny Stockbridge (Ase), Mary Reubens (Anitra), Mary Ruby (Ingrid).
The American Film Institute attributes this film, often attributed to Walsh, to Oscar Apfel.

1917

The Lone Cowboy (Fox)
Director: Raoul Walsh.
Cast: Tom Mix, Mildred Harris, Alan Hale, Crazy Wolf.
Mentioned by Walsh in “Each Man in his Time.”

1920

Headin’ Home (Kessell & Baumann)
Producers: William Shea, Herbert H. Yudkin. Supervisor: Raoul Walsh. Director: Lawrence Windom. Screenplay: Raoul Walsh, based on story by Earle Browne. Running time: 71 minutes. Released September 19, 1920.
Cast: Babe Ruth (Babe), Ruth Taylor (Mildred Tobin), William Sheer (Harry Knight), Margaret Seddon (Babe’s Mother), Frances Victory (Pigtails), James A. Marcus (Simon Tobin), Ralf Harolde (John Tobin), Charles Byer (David Talmadge), George Halpin (Doc Hedges), William J. Gross (Eliar Lott), Walter Lawrence (Tony Marino), Ann Brody (Mrs. Tony Marino), Ricca Allen (Almira Worters), Sammy Blum (Jimbo Jones), Ethel Kerwin (Kitty Wilson), Tom Cameron (Deacon Flack), Charles J. Hunt (Reverend David Talmadge).
According to Miriam Cooper, Walsh not only supervised but directed the film.

1923

Rosita (United Artists)
Producer: Mary Pickford. Director: Ernst Lubitsch, Raoul Walsh (uncredited). Screenplay: Edward Knoblock, based on the play “Don Cesar de Bazan” by Adolphe d’Ennery and Philippe Dumanoir. Cinematographer: Charles Rosher. Music: Louis F. Gottschalk. Art directors: Svend Gade, William Cameron Menzies. Costume designer: Mitchell Leisen. Assistant director: James Townsend. Running time: 90 minutes. Released September 3, 1923.
Cast: Mary Pickford (Rosita), Holbrook Blinn (The King), Irene Rich (The Queen), George Walsh (Don Diego), Charles Belcher (The Prime Minister), Frank Leigh (Prison Commandant), Mathilde Comont (Rosita’s mother), George Periolat (Rosita’s father).
Walsh stated he was brought in as collaborator at Mary Pickford’s request.

1931

The Spider (Fox)
Associate Producer: William Sistrom. Directors: Kenneth MacKenna, William Cameron Menzies. Writers: Lowell Brentano (play), Barry Connors, Philip Klein (screenplay). Cinematographer: James Howe [James Wong Howe]. Running time: 59 minutes. Released September 27, 1931. Walsh directed scenes uncredited.
Cast: Edmund Lowe (Chatrand), Lois Moran (Beverly), Ed Brendel (Ole).

1932

Hello Sister! (Fox)
Producers: Winfield R. Sheehan, Sol M. Wurtzel. Director: Erich von Stroheim, Alfred L. Werker, Alan Crosland. Screenplay: Erich von Stroheim and Leonard Spigelglass, based on the play “Walking Down Broadway” by Dawn Powell. Cinematographer: James Wong Howe. Editor: Frank E. Hull. Costume designer: Rita Kaufman. Sound: Alfred Bruzlin.
Cast: James Dunn (Jimmy), Zasu Pitts (Millie), Boots Mallory (Peggy), Minna Gombell (Mona), Terrance Ray (Mac).
James Wong Howe mistakenly attributed certain retakes to Walsh.

1934

Operator 13 (MGM)
Producer: Lucien Hubbard. Director: Richard Boleslawski. Screenplay: Harvey F. Thew, Zelda Spears, and Eve Greene, based on stories by Robert W. Chambers. Cinematographer: George J. Folsey. Editor: Frank Sullivan. Art director: Cedric Gibbons. Costume designer: Adrian. Running time: 85 minutes. Released June 8, 1934.
Cast: Marion Davies (Gail Loveless), Gary Cooper (Cpt. Jack Gailliard), Jean Parker (Eleanor Shackleford), Katharine Alexander (Pauline Cushman), Ted Healy (“Doctor” Hitchcock).
Walsh was replaced by Boleslawski after six days of shooting.

1935

Palm Springs (Paramount)
Producer: Walter Wanger. Director: Aubrey Scotto. Screenplay: Joseph Fields and Humphrey Pearson, based on the story “Lady Smith” by Myles Connolly. Cinematographer: James Van Trees. Editor: Robert L. Simpson. Production designer: Alexander Toluboff. Costume designer: Helen Taylor.
Cast: Frances Langford (Joan Smyth), Guy Standing (Cpt. Smyth), Ernest Cossart (Starkey), Smith Ballew (Slim), Spring Byington (Aunt Letty), David Niven (George Britell).
According to Filmograph (Vol. IV, number 4), the film was partially reshot by Walsh at the request of producer Wanger.

1943-1952

During his years at Warner, Walsh contributed to several films directed by his colleagues, including:
Action in the North Atlantic (1943, Lloyd Bacon)
Edge of Darkness (1943, Lewis Milestone)
In This Our Life (1942, John Huston)
Key Largo (1948, John Huston)
Montana (1950, Ray Enright)
Rocky Mountain (1950, William Keighley)
West Point Story (1950, Roy Del Ruth)
Maru Maru (1952, Gordon Douglas)
Walsh did not participate in Stallion Road (1947) or San Antonio (1945), although he is sometimes given credit.

1955

Helen of Troy (Warner Brothers)
Director: Robert Wise. Screenplay: Hugh Gray, John Twist, based on “The Iliad” by Homer. Cinematography: Harry Stradling, Jr. Editor: Thomas Reilly. Music: Max Steiner. Art director: Edward Carrere. Sound: Charles Lang. Makeup: Bill Phillips. Assistant director: Gus Agosti.
Cast: Rossana Podesta (Helen of Troy), Jacques Sernas (Paris), Cedric Harwicke (Priam), Stanley Baker (Achilles), Niall MacGinniss (Menelaus), Nora Swinburne (Hecuba), Robert Douglas (Agamemnon), Torin Hatcher (Ulysses), Harry Andrews (Hector), Janette Scott (Cassandra), Ronald Lewis (Aeneas), Brigitte Bardot (Andraste).
Walsh was called to Rome to direct additional battle scenes for the film.

1961

Come September (Universal)
Producers: Robert Arthur, Raoul Walsh (uncredited). Director: Robert Mulligan. Screenplay: Stanley Shapiro and Maurice Richlin, based on a story by Stanley Roberts and Robert Russell. Cinematographer: William H. Daniels. Editor: Russell F. Schoengarth. Music: Hans J. Salter. Art director: Henry Bumstead. Set decorator: John P. Austin. Costume design: Morton Haack. Sound: Sash Fisher, Waldon O. Watson. Assistant director: Joseph E. Kenney. Running time: 112 minutes. Filmed in Cinque Terre, Rome, and Portofino, Italy. Released August 9, 1961.
Cast: Rock Hudson (Robert L. Tablot), Gina Lollobrigida (Lisa Helena Fellini), Sandra Dee (Sandy Stevens), Bobby Darin (Tony), Walter Slezak (Maurice Clavell), Brenda De Banzie (Margaret Allison), Rossana Rory (Anna), Ronald Howard (Spencer), Joel Grey (Beagle), Rinne Haran (Sparrow).
Walsh co-produced the film with Seven Pictures Corporation.

1976

Nickelodeon (Columbia)
Director: Peter Bogdanovich. Screenplay: Peter Bogdanovich, W.D. Richter. Cinematography: László Kovács. Music: Richard Hazard. Editor: William C. Carruth. Art director: Richard Berger. Costume design: Theadora Van Runkle. Running time: 121 minutes. Released December 21, 1976.
Cast: Ryan O’Neal (Leo Harrigan), Burt Reynolds (Buck Greenway), Tatum O’Neal (Alice Forsyte), Brian Keith (H.H. Cobb), Stella Stevens (Marty Reeves), John Ritter (Franklin Frank).
Walsh, along with Allan Dwan, served as technical consultant on the film.

 

Walsh as Actor

1913

A Mother’s Love (Pathé)
Director: Emile Couteau. Running time: 1 r.
Cast: Dolly Larkin, Raoul Walsh. Filmed in Brooklyn, New York.

Paul Revere’s Ride (Pathé)
Director: Emile Couteau. Running time: 1 r.
Cast: Raoul Walsh, Dolly Larkin. Filmed in Fort Lee, New Jersey.

The Banker’s Daughter (Pathé)
Directors: William F. Haddock, Edward M. Roskam. Screenplay: Bronson Howard. Cinematographer: Fred Dobson. Running time: 1 r. Released April 15, 1914.
Cast: Katherine La Salle (Lillian Westbrook), William H. Tooker (Lawrence Westbrook), David Wall (John Strebelow), Harry Spingler (Count de Carojac), William Bailey (Harold Routledge), Joseph Bailey (George Washington Phipps), Ethel Phillips (Florence St. Vincent), Kitty Baldwin (Aunt Fanny Holbrook), Mab Rae (Natalie Strebelow), Philip Robson (Mr. Brown), Raoul Walsh.

The Pseudo Prodigal (Reliance)
Director: Raoul Walsh. Released December 20, 1913.
Cast: Sue Balfour, Miriam Cooper, Robert Harron, Ralph Lewis, Raoul Walsh.

1914

For His Master (Reliance)
Director: W. Christy Cabanne. Screenplay: George Pattullo. Running time: 2 r. Released February 7, 1914.
Cast: Fred Burns, Miriam Cooper, Frank Bennett, Raoul Walsh (Father Walsh).

When Fate Frowned (Reliance)
Director: William Christy Cabanne. Released March 17, 1914.
Cast: Miriam Cooper, Joseph Karl, Raoul Walsh.

The Great Leap: Until Death do Us Part (Reliance)
Supervising producer: D.W. Griffith. Director: W. Christy Cabanne. Screenplay by: Anthony Paul Kelly (written by). Cinematographer: G.W. Bitzer. Running time: 4 r. Released April 1914.
Cast: Mae Marsh (Mary Gibbs), Robert Harron (Bobby Dawson), Irene Hunt, Ralph Lewis, Raoul Walsh, Donald Crisp, Eagle Eye.

The Dishonored Medal (Reliance)
Supervising producer: D.W. Griffith. Director: W. Christy Cabanne. Running time: 4 r. Released May 3, 1914.
Cast: Miriam Cooper (Zora), George Gebhardt (Lieutenant Dubois), Raoul Walsh (Adopted son), Frank Bennett (Bel Kahn, son of Achmed), Mabel Van Buren (Anitra), Dark Cloud (Sheik Achmed).

The Double Knot (Majestic)
Director: Raoul Walsh. Running time: 2 r. Released May 24, 1914.
Cast: Mary Alden, Jack O’Brien, Raoul Walsh.

The Life of General Villa (Mutual)
Producers: H.E. Aitken, Frank N. Thayer. Supervising producer: D.W. Griffith. Director: W. Christy Cabanne. Writer: Frank E. Woods. Cinematographer: Raoul Walsh (Battle of Torreon sequence). Running time: 7 r. Released May 9, 1914.
Cast: Irene Hunt (Villa’s sister), W.H. Lawrence (Federal officer), Walter Long (Federal officer), Teddy Sampson (Villa’s sister), Pancho Villa (himself), Raoul Walsh (Villa as a young man), Eagle Eye, Mae Marsh, Robert Harron.
On 4/17/15 a version cut down to four reels was re-issued as The Outlaw’s Revenge, a Mutual Masterpiece.

The Rebellion of Kitty Belle (Mutual/Majestic)
Director: Christy Cabanne. Story: George Pattullo. Running time: 2 r. Released June 14, 1914.
Cast: Lillian Gish (Kitty Belle), Robert Harron (Joe Belle), Raoul Walsh (Bud Parker), Kate Bruce, Joseph Carle, Dorothy Gish, Alfred Paget.

The Only Clue (Majestic)
Running time: 1 r. Released: July 7, 1914.
Cast: Eugene Pallette, Irene Hunt, Raoul Walsh.

Lest We Forget (Majestic)
Director: John B. O’Brien. Running time: 1 r. Released July 24, 1914.
Cast: Elmer Clifton, Miriam Cooper, Josephine Cromwell, Ralph Lewis, Raoul Walsh.

The Angel of Contention (Majestic)
Director: John B. O’Brien. Screenplay: George Pattullo (from story by Will Levington Comfort). Running time: 2 r. Released July 5, 1914.
Cast: Lillian Gish, Spottiswoode Aitken, George Siegmann, Raoul Walsh.

The Mystery of the Hindu Image (Majestic)
Director: Raoul Walsh. Running time: 2 r. Released July 26, 1914.
Cast: Nick Cage, Dark Cloud, Richard Cummings, Eagle Eye, Raoul Walsh.

The Sheriff’s Prisoner (Reliance)
Director: Arthur Mackley, Raoul Walsh. Released July 29, 1914.
Cast: Eugene Pallette, Vester Pegg, Arthur Mackley, F.A. Turner, Florence Crawford, Richard Cummings, Raoul Walsh.

The Second Mrs. Roebuck (Mutual/Majestic)
Director: John B. O’Brien, W. Christy Cabanne. Screenplay: George Pattullo, from a story by W. Carey Wonderly. Running time: 2 r. Released August 23, 1914.
Cast: Mary Alden, John B. O’Brien, Wallace Reid (Samuel Roebuck), Blanche Sweet, Raoul Walsh.

Sierra Jim’s Reformation (Majestic)
Director: John O’Brien. Running time: 1 r. Released September 7, 1914.
Cast: Raoul Walsh (Sierra Jim), Wallace Reid (Tim), Gertrude McLynn, Fred Burns, Dark Cloud, Eagle Eye.

The Final Verdict (Majestic)
Director: John B. O’Brien. Running time: 2 r. Released September 13, 1914.
Cast: Francelia Billington (Mary), Raoul Walsh (King), Eagle Eye, Joseph Singleton.

The Unpainted Portrait (Majestic)
Running time: 1 r. Released October 6, 1914.
Cast: Mary Alden, Cora Drew, Raoul Walsh, Billie West.

Sands of Fate (Mutual/Majestic)
Director: Donald Crisp. Running time: 1 r. Released October 11, 1914.
Cast: Dorothy Gish (Helen), Robert Harron (Lee), Raoul Walsh (Holden), Cora Drew (Mrs. Robinson), Charles Eberts.
The Availing Prayer (Mutual/Majestic)
Director: Donald Crisp. Screenplay: Richard Barker Shelton. Running time: 1 r. Released October 30, 1914.
Cast: Dorothy Gish (May Rock), Raoul Walsh (The Doctor), Spottiswoode Aitken (William Rock), Bobby Burns, John P. McCarthy.

Paid with Interest (Majestic)
Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Anthony Paul Kelly. Running time: 1 r. Released November 1, 1914.
Cast: Robert Harron (Tom Taylor), Mae Marsh (Mame), Raoul Walsh (George Watson), Irene Hunt, Ralph Lewis.

The Little Country Mouse (Mutual/Majestic)
Supervising producer: D.W. Griffith. Director: Donald Crisp. Running time: 2 r. Released November 16, 1914.
Cast: Blanche Sweet (Dorothy), Wallace Reid (Lt. Hawkhurst), Mary Alden, Raoul Walsh.
They Never Knew (Reliance)
Director: Arthur Mackley. Running time: 1 r. Released November 25, 1914.
Cast: Florence Crawford (Rose), Vester Pegg (Ben), Raoul Walsh (Carroll), Arthur Mackley, George Siegmann.

Who Shot Bud Walton? (Reliance)
Director: Jack Adolfi. Running time: 2 r. Released December 5, 1914.
Cast: Sam De Grasse (Lafe Johnson), Raoul Walsh (Bud Walton), Eugene Pallette (Jeff Hardin), Francelia Billington (Tillie), Beulah Burns, Thelma Burns, Fred Hamer, Bob Burns, Fred Burns, Dark Cloud, Eagle Eye, John P. McCarthy.

The Exposure (Reliance)
Director: Fred Kelsey. Running time: 2 r. Released December 26, 1914.
Cast: Wallace Reid (Reporter), Irene Hunt (Helen), Raoul Walsh (Joe Reed), Ralph Lewis (Phelan), Howard Gage, William Lowery.

The Old Fisherman’s Story (Majestic)
Director: John B. O’Brien. Running time: 2 r. Released December 27, 1914.
Cast: Spottiswoode Aitken (the old fisherman), Raoul Walsh (Ben), Jack Conway (Ned), Mary Alden (The Gypsy), Lucille Browne, Arthur Maude, Seena Owen.

1915

Home from the Sea (Reliance/Majestic)
Supervising producer: D.W. Griffith. Director: Raoul Walsh. Running time: 1 r.
Cast: Raoul Walsh, Ralph Lewis, Francelia Billington.

The Love Pirate (Reliance)
Director: Edward Dillon. Story: Theodosia Harris. Running time: 2 r.
Cast: Fay Tincher (Viola), Raoul Walsh (The Magnate), Elmer Clifton (The Young Clubman), Beulah Burns, Bobby Ray, Frankie Newman.

The Double Deception (Majestic)
Running time: 1 r. Released February 5, 1915.
Cast: Elmer Clifton (Henry), Miriam Cooper (Laura), Raoul Walsh, Mazie Radford, Charles Courtwright, Jennie Lee.

The Death Dice (Reliance)
Director: Raoul Walsh. Story: George Pattullo. Running time: 2 r. Released February 13, 1915.
Cast: Eugene Pallette, Irene Hunt, Fred Burns, Vester Pegg, Joseph P. McCarthy.

The Fatal Black Bean (Majestic)
Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Russell Smith. Running time: 1 r. Released February 23, 1915.
Cast: Miriam Cooper, Elmer Clifton, Eagle Eye, Jennie Lee, Raoul Walsh.

The Birth of a Nation (Epoch, Majestic)
Producer: D.W. Griffith. Executive Producer: H.E. Aitken (uncredited). Director: D.W. Griffith. Screenplay: D.W. Griffith, Frank E. Woods, based on novel “The Clansman” by Thomas F. Dixon, Jr. Cinematographer by G.W. Bitzer. Editors: D.W. Griffith, Joseph Henabery, James Smith, Rose Smith, Raoul Walsh. Music: Joseph Carl Breil, D.W. Griffith. Costume Design: Robert Goldstein, Clare West (both uncredited). Special effects: Walter Hoffman, “Fireworks” Wilson (both uncredited). Running time: 12 r. Filmed in Los Angeles County and Big Bear Lake. World Premiere: February 8, 1915 at Clune’s, Los Angeles. Released March 3, 1915, New York.
Cast: Lillian Gish (Elsie Stoneman), Mae Marsh (Flora Cameron), Henry B. Walthall (Col. Ben Cameron), Miriam Cooper (Margaret Cameron), Mary Alden (Lydia Brown), Ralph Lewis (Austin Stoneman), George Siegmann (Silas Lynch), Walter Long (Gus), Robert Harron (Tod Stoneman), Wallace Reid (Jeff), Joseph Henabery (Abraham Lincoln), Elmer Clifton (Phil Stoneman), Josephine Crowell (Mrs. Cameron), Spottiswoode Aitken (Dr. Cameron), George Beranger (Wade Cameron), MAxfield Stanley (Duke Cameron), Jennie Lee (Mammy), Donald Crisp (Gen. Ulysses S. Grant), Howard Gaye (Gen. Robert E. Lee), Raoul Walsh (John Wilkes Booth; uncredited). Filmed from July 1914 to October 30, 1914.

The Greaser (Majestic)
Director: Raoul Walsh. Running time: 2 r. Released March 23, 1915.
Cast: Fred Church, Elmer Clifton, Miriam Cooper, Vester Pegg, Raoul Walsh.

The Outlaw’s Revenge (Mutual)
Director: William Christy Cabanne, Raoul Walsh. Filmed in Mexico. Released April 15, 1915.
Cast: Raoul Walsh (The outlaw), Irene Hunt (The outlaw’s older sister), Teddy Sampson (The outlaw’s younger sister), Mae Marsh (The American lover), Robert Harron (The American lover), Eagle Eye (The outlaw’s servant), Walter Long (Federal officer), Spottiswoode Aitken (The soothsayer), W.E. Lawrence (Federal officer).

A Man for All That (Majestic)
Director: Raoul Walsh. Running time: 2 r. Released April 17, 1915.
Cast: Elmer Clifton (Young convict), Miriam Cooper (Young boy’s sister), Tom Wilson (The warden), Raoul Walsh (Detective), Jennie Lee (Young boy’s mother), Paul Willis (Young boy).

The Smuggler (Majestic)
Director: Raoul Walsh. Running time: 1 r. Released May 11, 1915.
Cast: Raoul Walsh (Connors), Billie West (Betty Sampson), Ralph Lewis (John Sampson), John T. Dillon (Wilson), Elmer Clifton.

1916

Pillars of Society (Triangle)
Supervising director: D.W. Griffith. Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: D.W. Griffith, based on the play “Samfundets stotter” by Henrik Ibsen. Running time: 5 r. Released August 27, 1916.
Cast: Henry B. Walthall (Karsten Bernick), Mary Alden (Lona Tonnesen), Juanita Archer (Betty), George Beranger (Johan Tonnesen), Josephine Crowell (Karsten’s mother), Olga Grey (Madame Linda Dorf), Raoul Walsh.

1928

Sadie Thompson (United Artists)
Producers: Raoul Walsh, Gloria Swanson (uncredited). Director: Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Raoul Walsh, based on the story “Miss Thompson” by W. Somerset Maugham and the play “Rain” dramatized therefrom by John Colton and Clemence Randolph. Cinematography: George Barnes, Robert Kurrle, Oliver Marsh. Editor: C. Gardner Sullivan. Art director: William Cameron Menzies. Running time: 97 minutes. Filmed at UA Studios and on Santa Catalina Island, CA. Released January 7, 1928.
Cast: Gloria Swanson (Sadie Thompson), Lionel Barrymore (Alfred Davidson), Blanche Friderici (Mrs. Alfred Davidson), Charles Lane (Dr. Angus McPhail), Florence Midgley (Mrs. Angus McPhail), James A. Marcus (Joe Horn), Sophie Artega (Ameena), Will Stanton (Quartermaster Bates), Raoul Walsh (Sgt. Timothy O’Hara).

1929

In Old Arizona (Fox)
Directors: Irving Cummings, Raoul Walsh. Screenplay: Tom Barry, based on the story “The Caballero’s Way” by O. Henry. Cinematographer: Arthur Edeson. Editor: Louis R. Loeffler. Sound: Edmund H. Hansen. Running time: 7 r.
Cast: Warner Baxter (The Cisco Kid), Edmund Lowe (Sgt. Mickey Dunn), Dorothy Burgess (Tonia Maria)
Baxter won an Academy Award for Best Actor playing the role originally intended for Walsh, from which he had to withdraw when he lost an eye in an accident.

1949

’s a Great Feeling (Warner Brothers)
Producer: Alex Gottlieb. Director: David Butler. Screenplay: Jack Rose and Melville Shavelson, based on a story by I.A. L. Diamond. Cinematographer: Wilfred M. Cline. Editor: Irene Morra. Music: Jule Styne. Art director: Stanley Fleischer. Set decorator: Lyle B. Reifsnider. Costume designer: Milo Anderson. Sound: Charles David Forrest, Dolph Thomas. Makeup: Perc Westmore. Special effects: Hans F. Koenekamp, William C. McGann. Assistant director: Philip Quinn. Running time: 85 minutes. Released August 1, 1949.
Cast: Doris Day (Judy Adams), Dennis Morgan (himself), Jack Carson (himself), Bill Goodwin (Arthur Trent), Raoul Walsh (himself, uncredited).

Selective Raoul Walsh Bibliography

Books by Raoul Walsh:

Each Man in His Time. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1974.

La Colere des Justes (The Colors of the Righteous). Paris: Belford, 1972.

 

Books containing interviews with Walsh:

Bogdanovich, Peter. Who the Devil Made It? New York: Ballantine Books, 1997.

McGilligan, Patrick, ed. Film Crazy: Interviews with Hollywood Legends. New York: St. Martins-Griffin, 2000.

Schickel, Richard. The Men Who Made the Movies. New York: Antheneum, 1975.

Sherman, Eric, ed. Directing the Film: Directors on Their Art. For The American Film Institute. Los Angeles: Acrobat Books, 1976.

Stevens, George, Jr., ed. Conversations with The Great Moviemakers of Hollywood’s Golden Age—at The American Film Institute. New York: Vintage Books, 2006.

 

Books containing discussions of Walsh and his films:

Agee, James. Agee on Film: Essays and Reviews by James Agee, vol 1. New York: Perigee/Putnam Books, 1958

Behlmer, Rudy, ed. Inside Warner Bros., 1935-1951. New York: Viking Press, 1985.

Bernstein, Matthew. Walter Wagner, Hollywood Independent. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2000.

Bessie, Alvah. Inquisition in Eden. New York: Macmillan, 1965.

Bitzer, Billy. Billy Bitzer, His Story. New York: Farrar Straus and Giroux, 1973.

Brownlow, Kevin. Behind the Mask of Innocence: Sex, Violence, Prejudice,

Crime: Films of Social Conscience in the Silent Era. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1990.

———————. The Parade’s Gone By. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1968.

———————. The War, the West and The Wilderness. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1978.

Cagney, James. Cagney by Cagney. New York: Doubleday, 1976.

Canham, Kingsley. The Hollywood Professionals: Michael Curtiz, Raoul Walsh, Henry Hathaway, Volume 1. London: The Tantivy Press, 1973.

Caron, Leslie. Thank Heaven: A Memoir. New York: Viking Adult, 2009.

Casas, Joaquin, Raoul Walsh. Madrin: Ediciones JC, 1982.

Comuzio, Emmano. Raoul Walsh. Florence, Italy: La Nuovo Italia, 1974.

Cooper, Miriam. Dark Lady of the Silents: My Life in Early Hollywood. New York: Bobbs Merrill, 1973.

Coursodon, Jean-Pierre and Tavernier, Bertrand. American Directors, vol 1. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1983.

Crafton, Donald. The Talkies: American Cinema’s Transition to Sound,Berkeley: University of California Press, 1997.

D’Angela, Toni. Raoul Walsh o dell’avventura singolare. Rome, Italy: Bulzone Editore, 2008.

Donati, William. Ida Lupino: A Biography. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1996.

Douglas, Kirk. The Ragman’s Son. New York: Simon and Shuster, 1998.

Everson, William K. American Silent Film. New York: Da Capo Press, 1998.

Farber, Manny. Negative Space. New York: De Capo Press, 1998.

Fishgall, Gregory. Gregory Peck: A Biography. New York: Scribners, 2002.

Flynn, Errol. My Wicked, Wicked Ways. New York: Dell Publishing Company, 1959.

Forbes, Bryan. Notes for a Life. London: Collins, 1974.

Fox, Susan and Donald G. Rosellini. William Fox: A Story of Early Hollywood,Baltimore, Maryland: Midnight Marquee Press, 2006.

Freedland, Michael. The Two Lives of Errol Flynn: The Legends and the Truth about a Lovable, Outrageous Rogue. New York: William Morrow & Company, 1978.

Giddins, Gary. Bing Crosby: A Pocketful of Miracles: The Early Years, 1903-1940. Boston: Little, Brown and Company, 2001.

Golden, Eve. Vamp: The Rise and Fall of Theda Bara. Vestal, New York: Empire Publishers, 1996.

Gomery, Douglas. The Hollywood Studio System: A History. London: The British Film Institute Publishing, 2005.

Giuliani, Pierre. Raoul Walsh. Paris, France: Filmo 14, Edilig, 1985.

Grady, Bill. The Irish Peacock: Confessions of a Legendary Talent Agent. New Rochelle, New York: Arlington House, 1972.

Hardy, Phil. Raoul Walsh, Edinburgh Film Festival, 1974. Colchester, England: Vineyard Press, 1974.

Hunter, Tab. Tab Hunter Confidential: The Making of a Movie Star. Chapel Hill, North Carolina: Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill, 2005.

Marmin, Michael, Raoul Walsh. Paris, France: Seghers, 1970.

Mason, Fred. American Gangster Cinema: From Little Caesar to Pu`lp Fiction. New York: Palgrave MacMillan, 2002.

Mayo, Virginia. The Best Years of My Life. Chesterfield, MO: Beach House Books, 2001.

McCarthy, Todd. Howard Hawks: The Grey Fox of Hollywood. New York: Grove Press, 1997.

McBride, Joseph. Searching for John Ford: A Life. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 2001.

McGilligan, Patrick, ed. Backstory: Interviews with Screenwriters of Hollywood’s Golden Age, vol. 1. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1986.

———————- and Paul Buhle. Tender Comrades: A Backstory of the Hollywood Blacklist. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1997.

———————-. ed. White Heat. Winconsin/Warner Bros. Screen Play Series. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1984.

McLaglen, Victor. Express to Hollywood. London: Jarrolds Publishers, 1935.

Munn, Michael. John Wayne: The Man Behind the Myth. New York: New American Library, 2003.

Oppenheimer, Jerry. Idol: Rock Hudson. New York: Bantam Books, 1987

Parrish, Robert. Growing Up in Hollywood. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1976.

Poitier, Sydney. This Life. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1980.

Quinn, Anthony. One Man Tango. New York: Harper Collins, 1995.

Roberts, Jerry, ed. Mitchum: In His Own Words. New York: Limelight Editions, 2000.

Robinson, Edward G. and Leonard Spigelgass. All My Yesterdays. New York: Hawthorn Books, 1973.

Russell, Jane. Jane Russell: An Autobiography. New York: Franklin Watts, Inc., 1985.

Schickel, Richard. D.W. Griffith: An American Life. New York: Limestone, 1984.

Server, Lee. Robert Mitchum: “Baby, I Don’t Care”. New York: St. Martin’s Griffin, 2002.

—————. Screenwriter, Words Become Pictures. Pittstown, New Jersey,

1987. (Interviews with A.I. Bezzerides on They Drive by Night and Catherine Turney on The Man I Love.)

Sklar, Robert. City Boys: Cagney, Bogart, Garfield. Princeton, New Jersey: Princeton University Press, 1992.

Skorecki, Louis. Raoul Walsh et moi, suivi de Contre la nouvelle cinephilie. Paris, France: Presses Universitaires, 2001.

Sperber, A.M. and Lax, Eric. Bogart. New York: William Morrow and Company, 1997.

Swanson, Gloria. Swanson on Swanson: An Autobiography. New York: Random House, 1980.

Tornabene, Lyn. Long Live the King. New York: G.P. Putnum’s Sons, 1976.

Vance, Jeffrey with Tony Maietta. Douglas Fairbanks. Berkeley: University of Californa Press/Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, 2008.

Warner, Jack. My First Hundred Years in Hollywood. New York: Random House, 1965.

Watts, Jill. Mae West: An Icon in Black and White. New York: Oxford University Press, 2003.

West, Mae. Goodness Had Nothing to Do with It. New York: Manor, 1976.

Wills, Garry. John Wayne’s America. New York: Touchstone, 1998.

Wilson, Michael Henry. Raoul Walsh ou la saga du continent perdu. Paris, France: Cinematheque Francaise, 2001.

Youngkin, Stephen D. The Lost One: A Life of Peter Lorre. Lexington: The University Press of Kentucky.

 

Books relating to Walsh, his movies and his times:

Burnett, W.R., High Sierra. New York: Zebra Books, 1940.

Cary, Diana Serra. The Hollywood Posse: The Story of a Gallant Band of Horsemen Who Made Movie History. New York: Houghton Mifflin, 1975.

Cohen, Paula Marantz. Silent Film and the Triumph of the American Myth. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2001.

Courtney, Susan. Hollywood Fantasies of Miscegenation. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2005.

Custer, Elizabeth Bacon. Boots and Saddles: Life in Dakota with General Custer. New York and London: Harper and Brothers, 1885.

Fiedler, Leslie. Love and Death in the American Novel. New York: Stein and Day, 1966.

Graham, Cooper, Steve Higgins, Elaine Mancini, Joao Luiz Viera. D. W. Griffith and the Biograph Company. Metuchen, N.J.: Scarecrow Press, 1985.

Gunning, Tom. D.W. Griffith and the Origins of the American Narrative: The Early Years at Biograph. Champaign: The University of Illinois Press, 1993.

Kildare, Owen. My Mamie Rose: The Story of My Regeneration. New York: The Baker & Taylor Company, 1903.

Nasaw, David. The Chief: The Life of William Randolph Hearst. New York: Mariner Books, 2001.

Ramsaye, Terry. A Million and One Nights: A History of the Motion Picture Industry Through 1925. New York: Touchstone, 1954.

 

Articles in journals containing interviews with Walsh (in English):

Child, James. “Can You Ride the Horse?” Sight and Sound, Winter 1972-73.

Fox, Julian. “Action All the Way.” Films and Filming, June-July 1973.

McGilligan, Patrick, Debra Weiner and Bruce Dix. “Raoul Walsh Remembers Warners.” Velvet Light Trap, Autumn 1975.

Montgomery, Patrick. “Raoul Walsh Talks about D.W. Griffith. Film Heritage, Spring, 1975.

 

Articles in journals containing interviews with Walsh (in French):

Eyquem, Olivier, Henry, Michael et Saada, Jacques. “Entretien avec Raoul Walsh.” Positif, February 1973.

Noames, Jean-Louis. “Entretien avec Raoul Walsh.” Cahiers du Cinema, April 1964.

 

Journal, Newspaper articles about Walsh (in English)

Bodeen, DeWitt, “Raoul Walsh,” Films in Review, April 1982.

Brownlow, Kevin. “Raoul Walsh.” Film, Autumn 1982.

Conley, Walter. “Raoul Walsh, His Silent Films,” The Silent Picture, Winter 1970-1971.

Gallagher, John. “Raoul Walsh.” Films in Review, October 1987.

Higham, Charles. “He Directed Them All.” The New York Times, April 14, 1974.

Huggins, Roy. “Remembering Raoul Walsh.” Variety, October 27, 1987.

Kemp, Philip. “Walsh.” ed. John Wakeman, World Film Directors, vol 1. New York: Wilson, 1987, 1149-59.

McNiven, Roger. “The Western Landscape of Raoul Walsh.” The Velvet Light Trap, Autumn 1975.

———————. “Raoul Walsh, 1887-1981 [sic]. Film Comment, July-August 1981.

 

Journal articles about Walsh (in French)

Beylie, Claude. “Meconnaissance de Raoul Walsh.” Cinematext, May-June 1963.

Biette, Jean-Claude. “Apercu Raoul Walsh. Trafic, Winter 1998.

Bleys, Jean-Pierre. “Quelques jalons (peu connus) dans le parcours de Raoul Walsh.” Positif, July-August 1989.

Henry, Michael. “Raoul Walsh, le roman du continent perdu.” Positif, December 1998.

Phillip, Claude-Jean. “Un sublime si familiar.” Presence du Cinema, May 1962.

Ravanbaz, Raymond. “Le Monde de Raoul Walsh est celui de l’aventure.” Radio-Cinema-Television. February 22, 1959.

Saada, Jacques. “Un homme ocean. Presence du Cinema. May 1962.

Segond, Jacques. “Each Man in His Time and Raoul Walsh. ed. Phil Hardy. Positif, June 1976.

Villelaur, Anne. “Raoul Walsh. Dossiers du cinema, Cineastes II. Casterman, Paris, 1971.

French journals dedicated to Walsh: Specific issues

Presence du Cinema, May 1962.

Contrechamp, May 1962.

Cahiers du Cinema, April 1964.

Positif, February 1973.

Film and Filming, June, 1977.

Positif, December 1998.

Positif, April 2001.

 

Oral Histories, Seminars, Retrospectives

Haskin, Byron, interviewed by Joe Adamson. The Directors Guild of America Oral History Series. Los Angeles, 1984.

The New York Times Oral History. “Seminar with Raoul Walsh.” The American Film Institute, Los Angeles, 1977.

The Thousand Eyes. “Raoul Walsh.” New York, June 1974. Notes from the Raoul Walsh Retrospective at MOMA under the direction of Roger McNiven and Howard Mandelbaum.

 

 

‘Raoul Walsh’ Picked for
Newport Beach Film Fest

For Immediate Release

April 1, 2015

 “The True Adventures of Raoul Walsh”to Highlight the Documentary Section of the 16th Annual Newport Beach Film Festival

 The first feature-length documentary on the legendary Hollywood director screens April 25 and 29

He put John Wayne on a horse and Douglas Fairbanks on a flying carpet. He put a gun in Jimmy Cagney’s hands. He rode with Pancho Villa. He assassinated Lincoln in “Birth of a Nation.” He made films in every genre, from comedies to musicals to Westerns to war dramas to melodramas — more than 150 all told. He was an iconoclastic director who rolled his own cigarettes and wore an eye patch that earned him the moniker the “one-eyed bandit of Hollywood.” He was Raoul Walsh, one of Hollywood’s true icons, a tough-guy action director who left an indelible mark on classic Hollywood cinema.

“The True Adventures of Raoul Walsh” is the first feature-length documentary on Walsh, produced as a “memoir” in which he “recounts” his Hollywood career from the silent film era to the tumultuous 1960s. The documentary makes stunning use of rare, personal and production photos and footage, revealing Walsh’s extraordinary, adventurous life on and off the set. His life is nothing less than the story of Hollywood itself.

A master technician on the set, Walsh was also the original raconteur off the set, racking up a series of outrageous adventures with his actors and off-screen buddies Errol Flynn, Jimmy Cagney, Humphrey Bogart, Clark Gable and Gary Cooper. A dashing ladies man, he directed (on and off the screen) Theda Bara, Miriam Cooper, Dolores del Rio, Mae West and Gloria Swanson, among others. Walsh was assistant to D. W. Griffith, then directed the first gangster epic, “Regeneration,” in 1915, and created the innovative “The Thief of Bagdad” in 1924. He became Fox’s golden boy in the 1920s and 1930s, directing the 70mm widescreen “The Big Trail” (1930) and “The Bowery” (1933). He then was wooed to Warner Bros., where he found his true genius, directing such classic gangster and adventure films as “The Roaring Twenties” (1939), “They Drive By Night” (1940), “High Sierra” (1941), “They Died With Their Boots On” (1941), “Objective, Burma!” (1945) — considered one of the best war films ever produced — and “White Heat” (1949).

Yet Walsh’s private life, so veiled by his self-described adventures and “embellishments,” has never truly been known —  until now. This documentary is a must for Walsh fans, classic film fans, and the general audience who wants to know more about American film history. Walsh’s life is the story of Hollywood, a fascinating and adventurous tall tale, yet also a touching and deeply moving love story, in the best American tradition.

“The True Adventures of Raoul Walsh” was written and directed by Marilyn Ann Moss (also author of Walsh’s biography) and Joel Bender; and produced by Paul Lynch (director of cult favorite “Prom Night”).

“The True Adventures of Raoul Walsh” screens at the Island Cinemas 5:30 p.m. Sat., April 25 and 5:15 p.m. Wed, April 29, as part of the 16th Annual Newport Beach Film Festival.

The directors and producer are available for interviews and Q&As.

An electronic press kit with credits and synopses, as well as a large selection of photographs, can be downloaded from http://bitly.com/walshatnewport

A trailer can be found at: https://vimeo.com/105588430

Contact: Marilyn Ann Moss
mizmoss@earthlink.net
323-465-6484

Logline

“The True Adventures of Raoul Walsh” — the first feature on the life of the legendary Hollywood director — is a “memoir” in which the director “recounts” his Hollywood career, encompassing more than 150 films in almost every genre, from the silent film era to the tumultuous 1960s. Based on texts from Marilyn Ann Moss’s biography of Walsh, and using rare, personal and production photos and footage, the film allows Walsh to talk about his life and extraordinary adventures (on and off the set). This is the story of one man’s love of films and filmmaking … and the women he loved in his life. Walsh’s life is nothing less than the story of Hollywood itself.